Theory of Intelligent Design, the best explanation of Origins

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Theory of Intelligent Design, the best explanation of Origins » The catalog of life » There is no greater artist than the Creator

There is no greater artist than the Creator

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1 There is no greater artist than the Creator on Sat Mar 08, 2014 10:11 pm

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share if you like the collection......

http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1203-reynolds-animal-earth.html

http://arabianarcade.blogspot.com.br/2011/03/underwater-experiments.html

http://www.photographyserved.com/gallery/Another-World-Part-2/2362248

http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2012/07/arctic-sea-creatures/?viewall=true

Astonishing Pictures of Polychaetes (Scale Worms)

Arthur Ankers Photogallery , a must see

Red Sea at night

Feel the force: Tube-nosed bat which bears striking resemblance to Yoda discovered as scientists find hundreds of new species | DailyMail on Facebook

20 Creepiest and Scariest Looking Animals in the World

deepseacreatures

Extremophilephile: loving the unlovable

A natureza está repleta de espécies bizarras


amazing critters


31 fatos insanos sobre os olhos

mitsuhiko imamori minden pictures

great insect collection

Moth and butterflies

Naturecloseups

thefeaturedcreature

Animais bizarros

Scales and fangs

Johnson Lab

Cuteconoisseur

Ryan Photographic - Nature Images from Around the World

Nick Garbutt photogalleries

strange-animals

strange animals 2

Pauls rain forest picture gallery

Deep sea magic

Bats

The fish archive

amazing insects

Jumping spiders wonderful

Madreselva

Brad Wilson

the best collection

Stunning insects

Kelvin Lee, Raja Ampat

Diving4images

Underwater competition photos

Galeria Ricardo Araujo


Coloranddesign

Butterflies and insects, flickr

ocean wide images , fantastic.


Aquatic animals, great

real monstrosities

Weird fishes

https://www.flickr.com/photos/vipinbaliga/with/6793221029/


http://sgmacro.blogspot.com.br/

Tropical spiders

amazing critters flickr gallery

Kurts flickr gallery , amazing insects

Yasuni national park, Ecuador, amazing animals

the best flickr search enginge on the web



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2 Tardigrade extremophile with superpowers on Thu Mar 13, 2014 9:33 pm

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade

http://tumblr.4gifs.com/post/80148615619/waterbear-extremophile

Tardigrades (also known as waterbears or moss piglets)[2][3] are water-dwelling, segmented micro-animals, with eight legs.[2] They were first described by the German pastor J.A.E. Goeze in 1773. The name Tardigrada (meaning "slow stepper") was given three years later by the Italian biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani.[4]

Tardigrades are classified as extremophiles, organisms that can thrive in a physically or geochemically extreme condition that would be detrimental to most life on Earth.[5][6] For example, tardigrades can withstand temperatures from just above absolute zero to well above the boiling point of water, pressures about six times stronger than pressures found in the deepest ocean trenches, ionizing radiation at doses hundreds of times higher than the lethal dose for a person, and the vacuum of outer space. They can go without food or water for more than 10 years, drying out to the point where they are 3% or less water, only to rehydrate, forage, and reproduce.[7][8][9]

Usually, tardigrades are about 0.5 mm (0.020 in) long when they are fully grown.[2] They are short and plump with four pairs of legs, each with four to eight claws also known as "disks".[2] The animals are prevalent in mosses and lichens and feed on plant cells, algae, and small invertebrates. When collected, they may be viewed under a very-low-power microscope, making them accessible to students and amateur scientists.[10]

Tardigrades form the phylum Tardigrada, part of the superphylum Ecdysozoa. It is an ancient group, with fossils dating from 530 million years ago, in the Cambrian period.[11] The first tardigrades were discovered by Johann August Ephraim Goeze in 1773. Since 1778, over 1,150 tardigrade species have been found.


Meet the miniature water bear: nature's ultimate survivor or an alien from another planet?


http://www.asknature.org/strategy/5647adb99bf90b1c723987c7683ea169#.UyJ6KoVWkZc




"…Tardigrades are known to enter cryptobiosis at any stage of their life cycle, from egg to adult. Cryptobiosis has to be considered a form of quiescence, being directly induced and maintained by the occurrence of adverse conditions for an active life, and promptly broken once the adverse conditions are removed…In tardigrades, there are several forms of cryptobiosis: anhydrobiosis, cryobiosis, anoxybiosis and osmobiosis. Anhydrobiosis is the most studied. Entering anhydrobiosis, tardigrades contract their body into a so-called tun, loosing most of their free and bound water (>95%), synthesizing cell protectants  (e.g., trehalose, glycerol, heat shock proteins…and strongly reducing or suspending their metabolism…" (Bertolani et al. 2004:16)

"Most incredible of all, however, is the virtually indestructible nature of tardigrades while they remain in cryptobiosis. In laboratory experiments, cryptobiotic specimens have been chilled in liquid helium to -457°F (-272°C), which is only marginally above absolute zero. They have also been heated to temperatures exceeding 300°F (149°C), exposed to radiation doses far in excess of the lethal dose for humans, immersed in vats of liquid nitrogen, concentrated carbolic acid, hydrogen sulphide, brine, and pure alcohol, and even bombarded by deadly streams of electrons inside an electron microscope. Yet when removed from all of these incredibly hostile environments - which would have proven fatal for any other form of animal life - and moistened with water, these astounding creatures recovered.

They simply emerge from their cryptobiotic state, rehydrate themselves, and amble away on their four pairs of stubby claw-tipped legs, completely unharmed. Even today, the physiological mysteries behind the tardigrades' unparalleled powers of endurance during cryptobiosis remain unsolved." (Shuker 2001:113)








http://discovermagazine.com/2014/march/01-inside-a-tardigrade#.UyJ7AIVWkZd

The marine tardigrade (Actinarctus doryphorus ocellatus) is also known as a water bear or moss piglet, names that suggest size and heft. But this creature measures less than a millimeter long.

The hardy tardigrades mostly inhabit freshwater environments and can survive in many places, from Antarctica to rainforests.

To determine the animal’s position on the phylogenetic tree of life, researchers at the University of Hamburg-Zoological Museum Hamburg in Germany homed in on its nervous system and musculature, systems that may reflect evolutionary paths. Until this imaging, tardigrades were classified using external characteristics, leaving many questions unanswered.

To get the best view, the team used a confocal laser scanning microscope, which creates sharply defined photographs with a shallow field of focus. Stacking several photographic layers, each assigned a different color, they obtained this well-defined image of the entire animal.



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http://fishid.com/marinelifeblog/papua-new-guinea-%E2%80%93-field-notes-december-2008/







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http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/27868467596/moths-around-the-world-north-central-america









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http://www.thefeaturedcreature.com/2014/02/7-unbeweevably-cool-weevils-that-will-make-you-say-wow.html






http://thefeaturedcreature.thefeaturedcreat.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/antliarhis_zamiae.jpg













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8 Just wonderful.... on Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:36 pm

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9 Gods creation is amazing on Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:38 pm

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10 there is no greater inventor than God on Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:45 pm

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12 Lets contemplate the Lord's amazing creation on Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:53 pm

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13 Gods thoughts are higher than ours. on Fri Mar 21, 2014 5:09 pm

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14 How not be amazed..... on Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:39 pm

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19 Caterpillars, a work of art ! on Thu Mar 27, 2014 5:36 pm

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20 Gods creation is wonderful on Thu Mar 27, 2014 6:31 pm

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More amazingly beautiful birds... and top photography!

Gray-chinned Minivet, taken at DaSyueShan Trail, Taichung County, TAIWAN by John&Fish (https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnfish/) — com Irfan Manzoor.




http://whitinglab.com/?p=3248



When you see the colorful and threatening face above, what response does this evoke? Imagine a lizard predator about to grab a lizard and suddenly it flares it’s cheek flaps and simultaneously presents an angry, gaping mouth. Why do they flare these cheek flaps and could they also play a role in sexual selection? These questions are of great interest to behavioural ecologists interested in animal signals and communication. We organized an international team including Martin Whiting and Daniel Noble from the Lizard Lab (Macquarie Uni.) in Sydney, and Yin Qi from Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, to answer these questions and others that relate to the evolution of complex signalling in the toad-headed lizard genus Phrynocephalus. We also had the able assistance of Dr. Feng Xu from the Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences. We conducted this work in the Tukai Desert just outside Huocheng, Yili, near the bolder between China and Kazakhstan.

We tested several hypotheses on the function of display signals including an anti-predator function where the lizard might try and bluff its size and fighting ability, social function, or that it acts as a flash signal (a different anti-predator function). We conducted a large series of trials using small enclosures we assembled in the field and by also using tethering, where a loosely restrained lizard is presented to a free-ranging individual in the wild. We had never worked with this species before and there is very little published about its behaviour and ecology. Consequently, we conducted a series of pilot studies to work out the best approach in which we would be able to elicit a beahvioural response. We also measured the colour of the flaps using a Jaz optic spectrophotometer and this will allow us to model the conspicuousness of the signal in relation to a bird predators visual system. In the end, we were able to catch 92 lizards which means a rather handy morphological data set to examine variation in colour and sexual dimorphism. Our experiments revealed some surprising results and all will be revealed when we publish this work!

The Tukai Desert was a bit of an oven and this meant a somewhat short activity period for the lizard. Ironically, the days are long and we cant say exactly when the sun came up because we were generally asleep (maybe 6 am?) but the sun only went down at 1045 pm (China standard time)! As you may have gathered from Martin’s previous post, security in Huocheng is tight! The government police, the forest police, and the border police all paid their respects to us, copied our documents, and interviewed me extensively! It seemed they knew our every move! And they thought nothing about ringing me to ask questions mainly about Martin (you cant trust foreigners)!

Stay tuned for an upcoming post on the reptiles of the Tukai Desert. We will also post some photos of the amazing Phrynocephalus in full display mode, with some accompanying video. This is Qi Yin signing out from the Urumqi Airport in northern China where their secrity team just gave us a serious work-over!

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24 Slender Sea Moth (Pegasus volitans) on Fri May 09, 2014 6:56 pm

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http://www.realmonstrosities.com/2013/12/sea-moth.html#more

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8FgPLSG3Hn4



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25 Long-wattled Umbrellabird on Fri May 09, 2014 7:04 pm

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Long-wattled Umbrellabird

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-wattled_Umbrellabird

This species can be found in a relatively narrow belt along the Pacific slopes of the Chocó of western Colombia and Ecuador.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDPTj6i2_kM

http://www.realmonstrosities.com/2013/06/long-wattled-umbrellabird.html



http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=4522

Justification
A combination of extensive forest loss since 1960, and some pressure from hunting indicate that this species's population is declining rapidly. The population is presumably now small and fragmented in very small subpopulations. It therefore qualifies as Vulnerable.

Taxonomic source(s)
SACC. 2006. A classification of the bird species of South America. Available at: http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html.
Sibley, C. G.; Monroe, B. L. 1990. Distribution and taxonomy of birds of the world. Yale University Press, New Haven, USA.
Stotz, D. F.; Fitzpatrick, J. W.; Parker, T. A.; Moskovits, D. K. 1996. Neotropical birds: ecology and conservation. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.

Identification

51 cm. Large, ornate, black cotinga. Male all black with overhanging crest and long wattle hanging from central chest. Female and immature similar, but wattle much reduced or absent. Voice Generally silent, but displaying males grunt.

Distribution and population
Cephalopterus penduliger occurs on the Pacific slope and adjacent lowlands of south-west Colombia (Chocó to Nariño) and west Ecuador (Esmeraldas to El Oro), as well as in Ecuador's coastal cordillera (Esmeraldas and northern Manabí). In recent decades its distribution in lowland Ecuador has contracted greatly, but a few leks survived at altitudes as low as 80m at least until the early 2000s (O. Jahn in litt. 2007). There are concentrations of records in the far north of the known range in Valle de Cauca (Hilty and Brown 1986, Wege and Long 1995, N. Gómez in litt. 1999), east and west Esmeraldas and adjacent parts of Imbabura and Nariño, although this is likely to be a reflection of observer coverage and the species presumably occurs in suitable habitat between these areas (O. Jahn in litt. 2007). The rapidly declining population (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Jahn et al. 1999) is currently estimated at 7,290-48,600 mature individuals (O. Jahn in litt. 2007).

Population justification
The population is estimated to number 10,000-19,999 individuals based on an assessment of known records, descriptions of abundance and range size. This is consistent with recorded population density estimates for congeners or close relatives with a similar body size, and the fact that only a proportion of the estimated Extent of Occurrence is likely to be occupied. This estimate is equivalent to 6,667-13,333 mature individuals, rounded here to 6,000-15,000 mature individuals.

Trend justification
A rapid and on-going population decline is suspected owing to rates of habitat loss and hunting pressure.

Ecology
This lekking species is found in humid and wet forest from 80-1,800 m altitude (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Jahn et al. 1999, Jahn and Mena 2002b). In some areas, it is believed to make seasonal altitudinal movements (Ridgely and Tudor 1994, Hornbuckle et al. 1997, Jahn et al. 1999), although there are records throughout the year from lowland and foothill locations (K. S. Berg in litt. 1999, Jahn et al. 1999). It feeds on palm-nuts, insects, amphibians and reptiles such as lizards Anolis spp (Hornbuckle et al. 1997, K. S. Berg in litt. 1999, Jahn et al. 1999, Karubian et al. 2003, Greeney et al. 2006). Nests have been recorded in June and January, at the top of a tree fern Cyathea sp. 5 m in height and 4.5 m above the ground in a vine tangle, both in secondary forest (Karubian et al. 2003, Greeney et al. 2006). Although it appears somewhat tolerant of degraded habitats and human activity when selecting nest sites, it may prefer mature forest for feeding and lekking (Jahn et al. 1999, Jahn 2001, Jahn and Mena 2002b, Karubian et al. 2003).

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