Theory of Intelligent Design, the best explanation of Origins

This is my personal virtual library, where i collect information, which leads in my view to Intelligent Design as the best explanation of the origin of the physical Universe, life, and biodiversity


You are not connected. Please login or register

Theory of Intelligent Design, the best explanation of Origins » Various issues » Perguntas ....

Perguntas ....

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

1 Perguntas .... on Fri Oct 30, 2015 9:46 pm

Admin


Admin
Hi Brother, nice to meet you. If you run a ministry, you can join and introduce it at my Facebook group, and expose your needs , and prayer requests.

Hopeline.org :

https://www.facebook.com/groups/460666637413505/

This group has the goal to help Christians to meet evangelical ministers, missionaries, and Bible school students all around the world, in order to be able to help them with prayer, the ability to raise their financial support to help with their overall spiritual growth with Jesus Christ, etc.

Be blessed in Jesus name




Lindoia - 29 October 2015 07:06 PM
Replication upon which mutations and natural selection act could not begin prior when life started and cell’s began with self-replication.


I’m not quite ready to accept this as a maxim, or at least what it seems to be hinting at.  Certainly there are some decent arguments for it but there are decent arguments against.


What arguments would that be ?


After all the mere properties of chemicals that would have been present before the formation of life make the formation of life constituents likely or even necessary. 

Paul Nelson

“the Humpty Dumpty (HD) experiment.” refutes your claim.  The HD experiment has been described many times in the scientific literature, although to my knowledge it has never actually been performed, because everyone (except perhaps OOL researcher Jan Spitzer) knows what would happen. Nothing, except the irreversible chemical degradation of the cellular contents.

Here’s a 2011 description of the HD experiment, from OOL researcher William Martin:

“The proposal that life arose through the self-organisation of preformed constituents in a pond or an ice-pore containing some kind of preformed prebiotic broth can be rejected with a simple thought experiment: If we were to take a living organism and homogenize it so as to destroy the cellular structure but leave the molecules intact, then put that perfect organic soup into a container and wait for any amount of time, would any form of life ever arise from it de novo? The answer is no…”

Water is a natural and likely product of hydrogen and oxygen that would have been present in the early earth.  Hydrophobic and hydrophilic forces arising in completely non-living chemicals would have naturally given rise to the material that makes up membranes of cells. 


Fatty acid synthesis required for cell membranes is not a easy task.... 

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2168-the-amazing-fatty-acid-synthase-nano-factories-and-origin-of-life-scenarios


 While we don’t yet fully understand the development of life from non-living matter, we know that the ingredients were all present and that a completely non-living system was able to grow in complexity and organization naturally.


We know that ?? How ?? 


  It’s perhaps worth obviating the question of the laws of Thermal Dynamics:  This would not have constituted a violation of it when the laws are stated precisely.  Also it’s worth pointing out that this doesn’t yet describe natural selection or genes, or any form of reproduction—so in that sense you’re right.  Life is defined by its ability to reproduce and natural selection is a mechanism that takes place within the process of a species’ reproduction.  But I should also point out that you’re (possibly) wrong in the sense that this could have taken place before the appearance of any cells.  All that’s needed is some mechanism, fragile and simple as it might have been, to store genetic information and pass it on through reproduction.  In principle that’s possible even with a single strand of DNA outside of a cell.



RNR enzymes are required to make DNA. DNA is however required to make RNR enzymes. What came first ?? 
We can conclude with high certainty that this enzyme buries any RNA world fantasies, and any possibility of transition from  RNA to DNA world scenarios. 


ThyA and ThyX enzymes are required to make DNA. DNA is however required to make these enzymes. What came first ??  We can conclude with high certainty that this enzyme buries any RNA world fantasies, and any possibility of transition from  RNA to DNA world scenarios, since both had to come into existence at the same time. 


http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2028-origin-of-the-dna-double-helix


furthermore:


DNA is irreducible complex

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2093-dna-is-irreducible-complex

Individual bases : take away the sugar in the DNA backbone = no function
Take away the phosphate in the backbone = no function
Take away the nucleic acid bases = no function
Evolution is not a driving force at this stage, since replication of the cell depends on DNA.
So the individual DNA molecules are irreducible complex
DNA in general ( the double helix )
Unless the two types, purines, and pyrimidines are present, and so the individual four bases = no function, and no hability of information storage
The enzymes and proteins for assembly and synthesis of the DNA structure must also be present, otherwise, no DNA double helix......

Origin of the DNA deoxyribonucleic acid  double helix

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2028-origin-of-the-dna-double-helix

Self-organizing biochemical cycles 1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC18793/

How were ribonucleotides first formed on the primitive earth? This is a very difficult problem. Stanley Miller's synthesis of the amino acids by sparking a reducing atmosphere (2) was the paradigm for prebiotic synthesis for many years, so at first, it was natural to suppose that similar methods would meet with equal success in the nucleotide field. However, nucleotides are intrinsically more complicated than amino acids, and it is by no means obvious that they can be obtained in a few simple steps under prebiotic conditions. A remarkable synthesis of adenine (3) and more or less plausible syntheses of the pyrimidine nucleoside bases (4) have been reported, but the synthesis of ribose and the regiospecific combination of the bases, ribose, and phosphate to give β-nucleotides remain problematical.



According to geneticist Michael Denton, the break between the nonliving and the living world ‘represents the most dramatic and fundamental of all the discontinuities of nature.

According to many scientists, the discontinuity is in our understanding and not in the events taking place.  And the discontinuity is becoming ever more smooth the more that we know.  Of course this isn’t a proof that we’ll eventually close the gap, but there is certainly good reason to hope and poor reason to fundamentally conclude that the only way to close the gap is with a god.  (See also the broad topic of the “god of the gaps”.)


which came first, proteins or protein synthesis? If proteins are needed to make proteins, how did the whole thing get started?”


It’s certainly a deep problem but, as I’ve suggested, permits of a naturalistic answer:  Proteins may not be needed to make proteins even if that’s how the overwhelming majority of them are produced today.


Again. How do you possibley know ?? 




  Before there were any proteins there may have been certainly unlikely but still possible processes which could produce proteins.  Given enough time and wide-spread dense occurrences of the material necessary, even an unlikely process can become likely.




This is a frequently raised, but unsophisticated argument for Darwinian evolution and the origin of life. You can't just vaguely appeal to vast and unending amounts of time (and other probabilistic resources) and assume that Darwinian evolution or whatever mechanisms you propose for the origin of life, can produce anything "no matter how complex." Rather, you have to demonstrate that sufficient probabilistic resources or evolutionary mechanisms indeed exist to produce the feature.

What is education" when it produces individuals who swear that evolution is true or that those who oppose it don't understand the process.

The so called evolutionary argument is more a matter of assaulting the intelligence of those who oppose it with a range assertions that proponents of evolution really have no answer, how these mechanisms really work. To argue that forever is long enough for the complexity of life to reveal itself is an untenable argument. The numbers are off any scale we can relate to as possible to explain what we see of life. Notwithstanding, you have beings in here who go as far to say it's all accounted for already, as if they know something nobody else does.

http://bevets.com/evolutionevidence.htm

A Parable: 
Suppose a man walks up to you and says "I'm a billionaire."
You say "Prove it."
He says "ok", and he points across the street at a bank. "My money is in that bank there." (The bank is closed.) 
You say "What does that prove?" 
He says "Everyone knows banks have money in them"
You say "I know there is money in the bank, but why should I believe that it's YOUR money?"
"Because it's GREEN" he says. 
"What else can you show me?" 
He reaches in his pocket and pulls out a penny. "See -- I'm a billionaire."
You're still skeptical. 'What does that prove?', you ask. 
"I'M A BILLIONAIRE" he states loudly (obviously annoyed that you would question him). He reaches in another pocket and pulls out another penny, "Do you believe me now?"








I think my general response to your argument is:  You’re focusing on the processes of cells and life as they are now (and have been for billions of years), and in that regard you are right, the vast majority do and must come from antecedent living processes—possibly even all of them do.  But when we reach back far enough, that’s not necessarily true.  The earliest cells could have come from previous non-cellular life, which were themselves produced by rare but possible non-living processes that would have had a long time and a great number of opportunities to occur.


Thats another unsubstantiated claim........




At the end of the day we don’t know the full story, which doesn’t imply that therefore an completely naturalistic explanation is impossible or even unlikely.
I think this is one of those arguments that you feel is compelling when you want the conclusion to be true, but not when you’re indifferent to the conclusion.


Nice evolution of the gaps argument. 



Last edited by Admin on Sat Jul 29, 2017 7:21 am; edited 1 time in total

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

2 Re: Perguntas .... on Sat Oct 31, 2015 3:51 pm

Admin


Admin
For one thing I repeatedly noted the difference in how life is constituted now from how it was likely constituted early on.  While today all life that I know of is cellular, it was my explicit suggestion that the earliest life could have been non-cellular

That is speculation based on NO evidence whatsoever. If life not based on cells would be possible, and existed, we should find some kind of evidence in the fossil record, and eventually such kind of life would still exist today.

Are you saying it’s categorically impossible that proto-membranes might have formed early on?

I say the cell had to arise all at once. No step-wise evolutionary manner was possible.

Cell Membranes, origins through natural mechanisms, or design ?  

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2128-membrane-structure#3798

According to this website : The Interdependency of Lipid Membranes and Membrane Proteins
The cell membrane contains various types of proteins, including ion channel proteins, proton pumps, G proteins, and enzymes. These membrane proteins function cooperatively to allow ions to penetrate the lipid bilayer. The interdependency of lipid membranes and membrane proteins suggests that lipid bilayers and membrane proteins co-evolved together with membrane bioenergetics.

The nonsense of this assertion is evident. How could the membrane proteins co-evolve, if they had to be manufactured by the machinery , protected by the cell membrane ?

The cell membrane contains various types of proteins, including ion channel proteins, proton pumps, G proteins, and enzymes. These membrane proteins function cooperatively to allow ions to penetrate the lipid bilayer.

The ER and Golgi apparatus together constitute the endomembrane compartment in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The endomembrane compartment is a major site of lipid synthesis, and the ER is where not only lipids are synthesized, but membrane-bound proteins and secretory proteins are also made.

So in order to make cell membranes, the Endoplasmic Recticulum is required. But also the Golgi Apparatus, the peroxysome, and the mitochondria. But these only function, if protected and encapsulated in the cell membrane.  What came first, the cell membrane, or the endoplasmic recticulum ? This is one of many other catch22 situations in the cell, which indicate that the cell could not emerge in a stepwise gradual manner, as proponents of natural mechanisms want to make us believe.

Not only is the cell membrane intricate and complex (and certainly not random), but it has tuning parameters such as the degree to which the phospholipid tails are saturated. It is another example of a sophisticated biological design about which evolutionists can only speculate. Random mutations must have luckily assembled molecular mechanisms which sense environmental challenges and respond to them by altering the phospholipid population in the membrane in just the right way. Such designs are tremendously helpful so of course they would have been preserved by natural selection. It is yet another example of how silly evolutionary theory is in light of scientific facts.

Because we know that the atoms that make up the planet now were mostly the same as then.  We know that non-living processes will form compounds that are components of living organisms.

Paul Davies reinforced the point that obtaining the building blocks would not explain their arrangement:

‘… just as bricks alone don’t make a house, so it takes more than a random collection of amino acids to make life. Like house bricks, the building blocks of life have to be assembled in a very specific and exceedingly elaborate way before they have the desired function.’63

An analogy is written language. Natural objects in forms resembling the English alphabet (circles, straight lines, etc.) abound in nature, but this fact does not help to understand the origin of information (such as that in Shakespeare’s plays). The reason is that this task requires intelligence both to create the information (the play) and then to design and build the machinery required to translate that information into symbols (the written text). What must be explained is the source of the information in the text (the words and ideas), not the existence of circles and straight lines. Likewise, it is not enough to explain the origin of the amino acids, which correspond to the letters. Rather, even if they were produced readily, the source of the information that directs the assembly of the amino acids contained in the genome must be explained.


I’m not committed to the early predecessors of cellular life being structured in the same way that modern DNA or RNA is.  All that’s necessary are naturalistic mechanisms that are able to store and reproduce information, which could plausibly have changed incrementally until at some time we see the existence of cells and DNA.

More baseless guesswork and speculation.

Origin and evolution of the genetic code: the universal enigma
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3293468/

In our opinion, despite extensive and, in many cases, elaborate attempts to model code optimization, ingenious theorizing along the lines of the coevolution theory, and considerable experimentation, very little definitive progress has been made.

Summarizing the state of the art in the study of the code evolution, we cannot escape considerable skepticism. It seems that the two-pronged fundamental question: “why is the genetic code the way it is and how did it come to be?”, that was asked over 50 years ago, at the dawn of molecular biology, might remain pertinent even in another 50 years. Our consolation is that we cannot think of a more fundamental problem in biology.


You seem to, for understandable reasons, want to assume that any life has to look like modern life.  That makes it much less likely that all of the complexity that exists could have come from raw materials.  But of course, there are other possibilities.  You act as if the current inability to give a full explanation of abiogenesis ipso facto proves the falsity of abiogenesis.  You have evaluated one abiogenesis hypothesis, and a straw man at that, and therefore concluded that the only theory in competition with theism must be wrong.


http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t2176-lucathe-last-universal-common-ancestor

The last universal common ancestor represents the primordial cellular organism from which diversified life was derived. This urancestor accumulated genetic information before the rise of organismal lineages and is considered to be either a simple 'progenote' organism with a rudimentary translational apparatus or a more complex 'cenancestor' with almost all essential biological processes. Recent comparative genomic studies support the latter model and propose that the urancestor was similar to modern organisms in terms of gene content.

How were ribonucleotides first formed on the primitive earth? This is a very difficult problem.
I look forward to investigations into it and any progress we might make.  Do you?

Why should i ? I have a formed opinion, which i told you already.

Again. How do you possibley know ??
I have all along asserted our mutual lack of knowledge in this field.  You assert that you know.  I’m skeptical of your assertion.

Feel free to keep your skepticism and wilful ignorance, if that position pleases you.

But by all means if your proof is conclusive, do publish and let’s see the consequent scientific consensus that will follow.  Please.  I eagerly await the breakthrough and paradigm shift in modern science.

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t1508-will-we-eventually-discover-a-naturalistic-explanation-for-first-life

If a certain line of reasoning  is not persuasive or convincing, then why do atheists not change their mind because of it? The more evolution papers are published, the less likely the scenario becomes. Some assertions have even been falsified. We should consider the fact that modern biology may have reached its limits on several  subjects of biology. All discussions on principal theories and experiments in the field either end in vague suppositions and guesswork, statements of blind faith, made up scenarios,  or in a confession of ignorance.  Fact is  there remains a huge gulf in our understanding… This lack of understanding is not just ignorance about some technical details; it is a big conceptual gap.  The reach of the end of the road is evident in the matter of almost all major questions. The major questions of macro change and abiogenesis  are very far from being clearly formulated, even understood,  and nowhere near being solved, and for most, there is no solution at all at sight. But proponents of evolution firmly believe, one day a solution will be on sight. Isn't that a prima facie of a " evolution of the gap" argument ? We don't know yet, therefore evolution and abiogenesis ? That way, the God hypothesis remains out of the equation in the beginning, and out at the end, and never receives a serious and honest consideration. If the scientific evidence does not provide satisfactory explanations through naturalism, why should we not change your minds and look somewhere else ?


That’s an unsophisticated distortion of my argument.  I’m not appealing in any way from evolutionary processes.  I’m not merely appealing to vast amounts of time, but also of the existence of natural processes that we know would have given rise to components of life.

Which are ??


 How those components then formed more complex components, and then those more complex components could have again assembled into something more complex until we reach a point where life emerges—we don’t know.  But it’s not impossible, and it’s the best hypothesis on the scientific market.


Ahm , we don't know, therefore naturalism. Nice naturalism of the gaps argument, LOL.....


Or you can try to enumerate every possible hypothesis (those currently proposed by scientists and those people haven’t even thought of yet) and disprove each.  So far you’ve disproved only the weakest version of abiogenesis.

We have enough reasons to reject abiogenesis as a viable option.

http://www.evidenceunseen.com/articles/science-and-scripture/the-origin-of-life/

CLAIM: Advocates of this view argue that naturalistic science will eventually explain all mysteries in scientific knowledge. If we allow God to fill in these gaps, eventually he will be displaced, when science explains how life originated naturally.

RESPONSE: I have dealt with the “God of the gaps” argument in an earlier article. However, in addition to that material, we should consider the fact that modern biology may have reached its limits on this subject. For instance, biochemist Klaus Dose writes,

  More than 30 years of experimentation on the origin of life in the fields of chemical and molecular evolution have led to a better perception of the immensity of the problem of the origin of life on earth rather than to its solution. At present all discussions on principal theories and experiments in the field either end in stalemate or in a confession of ignorance.

In his 1999 book The Fifth Miracle, agnostic Paul Davies writes :


  When I set out to write this book, I was convinced that science was close to wrapping up the mystery of life’s origin… Having spent a year or two researching the field, I am now of the opinion that there remains a huge gulf in our understanding… This gulf in understanding is not merely ignorance about certain technical details; it is a major conceptual lacuna.

More recently in 2010, Davies explains,

“All that can be said at this time is that the problem of life’s origin is very far from being clearly formulated, and nowhere near being solved.”

Agnostic microbiologist Franklin Harold writes,

  Of all the unsolved mysteries remaining in science, the most consequential may be the origin of life… The origin of life is also a stubborn problem, with no solution in sight.

We might also point out that the scientific evidence for the origin of life persuaded one of the world’s leading atheists, Antony Flew, to begin to believe in God. In his 2007 book There is a God, Flew explains,

“The only satisfactory explanation for the origin of such ‘end-directed, self-replicating’ life as we see on earth is an infinitely intelligent Mind.”



I don’t know everything in Chemistry, although I am currently working to figure some of it out (unfortunately I’m also busy studying Modal Logic, Electricity and Magnetism, and ancient history—shall I suggest to you that because these subjects lack evidence of a god and you don’t know about them, that therefore you’re just stubborn if you don’t accept my authority in the matter?).  Are you suggesting that I can’t believe anything, just because I don’t know everything?  Only tenured Chemistry professors with the most advanced modern knowledge of the subject are allowed to hold any belief about abiogenesis?  It’s not enough that I know the basic ideas and I know that the subject is a wide-open question in modern science (even though, ironically, evolution is a completely closed matter in the field of Biology, where all of the experts agree—and yet you give hints that you don’t believe in it)?

they agree on what exactly ?? and why ??

No, we all go on the best information that we have at any given time.  Do I believe in evolution like a religion?  No, it has a probability of truth.  A probability that is many times greater than theism, sure

No kidding. How do you possibly know ? You admitted you are not a expert in the field.......


Thats another unsubstantiated claim….....
Again, I’m not attempting to substantiate it.  That’s the work of scientists.  I’m pointing out that naturalism isn’t without any possible answer to abiogensis.

And i am poiting out that abiogenesis is a utterly failed hypothesis. Its simply IMPOSSIBLE.

Abiogenesis is impossible

http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t1279-abiogenesis-is-impossible

A number of researchers have concluded that the spontaneous origin of life cannot be explained by known laws of physics and chemistry. Many seek “new” laws which can account for life’s origin. Why are so many unwilling to simply accept what the evidence points to: that the theory of evolution itself is fundamentally implausible? Dean Kenyon answers, “Perhaps these scientists fear that acceptance of this conclusion would leave open the possibility (or the necessity) of a supernatural origin of life” (p.viii).
1


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10818565

The origin of the first cell, cannot be explained by natural selection


The cell is irreducible complex, and hosts a hudge amount of codified, complex, specified information. The probability of useful DNA, RNA, or proteins occurring by chance is extremely small. Calculations vary somewhat but all are extremely small (highly improbable). If one is to assume a hypothetical prebiotic soup to start there are at least three combinational hurdles (requirements) to overcome. Each of these requirements decreases the chance of forming a workable protein. First, all amino acids must form a chemical bond (peptide bond) when joining with other amino acids in the protein chain. Assuming, for example a short protein molecule of 150 amino acids, the probability of building a 150 amino acids chain in which all linkages are peptide linkages would be roughly 1 chance in 10^45. The second requirement is that functioning proteins tolerate only left-handed amino acids, yet in abiotic amino acid production the right-handed and left-handed isomers are produced in nearly the same frequency. The probability of building a 150-amino-acid chain at random in which all bonds are peptide bonds and all amino acids are L-form is roughly 1 chance in 10^90. The third requirement for functioning proteins is that the amino acids must link up like letters in a meaningful sentence, i.e. in a functionally specified sequential arrangement. The chance for this happening at random for a 150 amino acid chain is approximately 1 chance in 10^195. It would appear impossible for chance to build even one functional protein considering how small the likelihood is. By way of comparison to get a feeling of just how low this probability is consider that there are only 10^65 atoms in our galaxy.

 I would love for us to learn what happened and how, but currently nobody knows.  Does that mean a god must have done it?  No, it means that possibly it was one of the various theories of naturalistic abiogenesis that we have not *yet* been able to substantiate, or if all else fails, I guess the insanity of theism is all that’s left.

Again. Nice naturalism of the gaps argument... LOL....

Nice evolution of the gaps argument.
Thing is, the gaps keep closing in our favor and against yours.

Nope. Exactly the oposit is the case.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

3 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Dec 17, 2015 7:51 pm

Admin


Admin
Biochemistry 5th edition


Os hidratos de carbono ou sacarídeos são as moléculas biológicas mais abundantes.  Mais que a metade de todo o carbono orgânico no planeta Terra é armazenado em apenas duas moléculas de carboidratos - amido e celulose. Ambos são polímeros de monômeros de açúcar, glicose. A única diferença entre eles é a maneira em que as unidades de glucose são unidas entre si. A glicose é feita por plantas verdes e armazenado sob a forma de amido como as reservas de energia das plantas. Os animais (incluindo humanos) têm uma enzima que reconhece a conformação helicoidal de amido e pode degrada-las em suas unidades de glucose. Glicose, oxidado a dióxido de carbono e água, é a nossa fonte de energia primária. Celulose, um dos principais componentes das paredes celulares das plantas e, por conseguinte, de algodão e madeira, é um polímero de monômeros de glucose. Eles são quimicamente mais simples do que nucleotídeos ou aminoácidos, contendo apenas três elementos :carbono, hidrogênio, oxigênio e hidratos de carbono (ou glicanos como eles são freqüentemente chamados) que incluem açúcares simples (ou monossacarídeos) e todas as moléculas maiores construídas de blocos de construção de açúcar. Carboidratos funcionam sobretudo como reserva de energia química e como materiais de construção  durável biológicos. Os açúcares que contêm três átomos de carbono são conhecidos como trioses, aqueles com quatro carbonos, tetroses como aqueles com cinco átomos de carbono, como pentoses, esses com seis carbonos como hexoses, e aqueles com sete carbonos como heptoses. monossacáridos podem ser amarrados juntos em formas quase ilimitadas para formar polissacarídeos. Carboidratos, como veremos, não catalisam reações químicas complexas como fazer proteínas, carboidratos nem se replicam como fazem ácidos nucleicos. E porque polissacarídeos não são construídos de acordo com um  "projeto" genético , como
são ácidos nucleicos e proteínas, eles tendem a ser heterogêneos, tanto  no tamanho e na composição differentemente que outras moléculas biológicas.


Três polissacáridos com monômeros de açúcar idênticos mas propriedades radicalmente diferentes. O glicogênio (a), amido (b), e celulose (c) estão cada uma composta inteiramente de subunidades de glicose, mas as suas propriedades químicas e físicas são muito diferentes devido às distintas maneiras que os monômeros estão ligados uns aos outros (três tipos diferentes de ligações são indicados pelos números circulados). moléculas de glicogênio são os mais altamente ramificados, moléculas de amido assumem um arranjo helicoidal, e celulose são moléculas não ramificadas e altamente
estendidas. Enquanto glicogênio e amido são depósitos de energia, moléculas de celulose são agrupadas em fibras duras que são adequados para seu papel estrutural. Micrografias eletrônicas coloridas mostram grânulos de glicogênio em uma célula do fígado, grãos de amido (amiloplastos) em uma semente de uma planta , e fibras de celulose numa parede celular vegetal; cada é indicado por uma seta.


Cell and molecular biology
 
Fundamentals of biochemistry


 
Hardin bertoni Kleinsmith World of the cell
 
Lehninger principles of biology


Carbohydrates are the most abundant biomolecules on
Earth. Each year, photosynthesis converts more than
100 billion metric tons of CO2 and H2O into cellulose
and other plant products. Certain carbohydrates (sugar
and starch) are a dietary staple in most parts of the world,
and the oxidation of carbohydrates is the central energyyielding
pathway in most nonphotosynthetic cells. Carbohydrate
polymers (also called glycans) serve as structural
and protective elements in the cell walls of bacteria and
plants and in the connective tissues of animals. Other carbohydrate
polymers lubricate skeletal joints and participate
in recognition and adhesion between cells. Complex
carbohydrate polymers covalently attached to proteins or
lipids act as signals that determine the intracellular location
or metabolic fate of these hybrid molecules, called glycoconjugates.
This chapter introduces the major classes
of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates and provides a few
examples of their many structural and functional roles.
Carbohydrates are polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones,
or substances that yield such compounds on hydrolysis.
Many, but not all, carbohydrates have the empirical formula
(CH2O)n; some also contain nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur.
There are three major size classes of carbohydrates:
monosaccharides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides
(the word “saccharide” is derived from the Greek
sakcharon, meaning “sugar”). Monosaccharides, or
simple sugars, consist of a single polyhydroxy aldehyde
or ketone unit. The most abundant monosaccharide in
nature is the six-carbon sugar D-glucose, sometimes referred
to as dextrose. Monosaccharides of four or more
carbons tend to have cyclic structures.
Oligosaccharides consist of short chains of monosaccharide
units, or residues, joined by characteristic
linkages called glycosidic bonds. The most abundant are
the disaccharides, with two monosaccharide units.
Typical is sucrose (cane sugar), which consists of the
six-carbon sugars D-glucose and D-fructose. All common
monosaccharides and disaccharides have names ending
with the suffix “-ose.” In cells, most oligosaccharides
consisting of three or more units do not occur as free entities
but are joined to nonsugar molecules (lipids or
proteins) in glycoconjugates.
The polysaccharides are sugar polymers containing
more than 20 or so monosaccharide units; some have
hundreds or thousands of units. Some polysaccharides,
such as cellulose, are linear chains; others, such as
glycogen, are branched. Both glycogen and cellulose
consist of recurring units of D-glucose, but they differ in
the type of glycosidic linkage and consequently have

strikingly different properties and biological roles.
 
Molecular biology, principles of genome function




 
Molecular biology , Weaver




 
Genetics, principles and analysis
 

Biologia molecular da célula, Alberts

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

4 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Dec 17, 2015 8:22 pm

Admin


Admin
o "Movimento do design inteligente," como é às vezes chamado, é bastante recente. Originou-se com a publicação de vários livros, entre 1984 e 1992, e uma pequena reunião organizada pelo professor de direito em Berkeley Phillip E. Johnson perto Monterey, Califórnia, em 1993

Uma vez que o design inteligente se baseia em evidências científicas e não na Escritura ou doutrinas religiosas , não é criacionismo bíblico. O design inteligente não faz nenhuma declaração sobre cronologia bíblica, e criacionistas bíblicos têm distinguido claramente seus pontos de vista do DI. Uma pessoa não precisa mesmo crer em Deus para inferir design inteligente na natureza; caso contrário, o proeminente ateu  Antony Flew poderia não ter sido persuadido de que as provas da natureza apontam para um projeto.

O DI não afirma que o design deve ser  ideal ou perfeito; algo pode ser concebido, mesmo que seja falho. Quando os fabricantes de automóveis fazem um recall de veículos defeituosos, eles estão mostrando que aqueles veículos foram mal concebidos, não que não eram projetados.

Mesmo projetos sub-ótimos exigem um designer. A máquina a vapor de Newcomen não era tão eficiente ou prática como o motor a vapor Watts ', mas ninguém no seu perfeito juízo iria sugerir nesta base que o motor de Newcomen se auto-montou por acaso. Em segundo lugar, alguns projetos que podem parecer abaixo do ideal para nós são, por exemplo ótimos como por exemplo o  polegar do panda; o panda usa seu "polegar" (na verdade um osso especializado no pulso) para a próxima apreensão contínua de bambu. Se tivesse usado um polegar opositor a fazê-lo, como proponentes do naturalismo sugeriram como um design superior, iria quase certamente sofrer de síndrome do túnel do carpo permanente. Em terceiro lugar, o que vemos agora é o mundo como marcado pela maldição sobre o pecado. Pois todos nós sabemos, o ser humano como criado pode ter sido capaz de sintetizar todas as vitaminas necessárias, mas algumas dessas habilidades podem ter sido posteriormente perdidas devido à corrupção genética e drift. Além disso: Desde que a história de Genesis inclui a origem do pecado e da morte, é extremamente fundamental para a lógica do evangelho: um mundo bom, arruinado pelo pecado, a ser restaurado no futuro.

O design inteligente é compatível com alguns aspectos da evolução darwiniana. O ID não nega a realidade da variação e seleção natural; ele apenas nega que esses fenômenos podem realizar tudo que os darwinistas afirmam que pode realizar. O ID não sustentam que todas as espécies foram criadas em seu presente estado; De fato, alguns defensores do DI têm nada contra a ideia de que todos os seres vivos descendem de um ancestral comum. ID desafia somente a suficiência dos processos naturais não guiados
e a afirmação darwinista que o projeto nos seres vivos é uma ilusão em vez  que uma realidade.

Design inteligente pode ser aplicado em dois níveis diferentes. Design pode ser detectável em características específicas dos seres vivos, mas também pode ser detectável em leis naturais e da estrutura do cosmos. A maioria das pessoas que se consideram defensores do DI mantem não só que o design é empiricamente detectável no cosmos como um todo, mas também que algumas características do mundo natural (como as formas de rochas na base de um penhasco) não são projetadas no mesmo sentido que outras características (tais como a informação no DNA) são projetadas.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

5 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Dec 17, 2015 11:50 pm

Admin


Admin
Bioquímica e a organização das células

Organismos vivos complexos originam a partir de elementos simples. Carbono, hidrogênio, e oxigênio se combinam para tornar-se muitos tipos diferentes de biomoléculas,
tais como hidratos de carbono e ácidos gordos. A adição de nitrogênio, tal como enxofre, torna possível que os aminoácidos se combinam para formar proteínas.
Por sua vez, a adição de fósforo fornece os ingredientes para produzir DNA, RNA, e lípidos complexos. Assim, ocorre um "edifício-up" de átomos as pequenas unidades moleculares para biomoléculas grandes, tais como proteínas e os ácidos nucleicos, RNA e DNA. Uma coleção de moléculas que interagem, envolto em uma membrana adequada, torna-se uma célula-a unidade básica de vida. As células têm um núcleo central do material genético, DNA, que contém as informações necessárias para fazer um organismo completo. Em procariontes unicelulares, tais como bactérias, o material nuclear não está dentro de uma membrana. As células de plantas e animais (chamadas eucariontes) são mais organizadas,
com o núcleo envolvido por uma membrana separada. Fungos e protistas são também classificados como eucariotas. Compartimentos especializados para funções específicas são característicos de células eucarióticas. Nas plantas, a fotossíntese leva aos cloroplastos: A energia da luz é convertida em energia química e armazenado como hidratos de carbono. Nas mitocôndrias das células eucarióticas, o armazenado de energia de carboidratos e lipídeos é recuperada através da respiração, um processo em que os compostos de carbono são oxidados em dióxido de carbono e água.

Os organismos vivos, e mesmo as células individuais do que as compõem, são extremamente complexos e diversificados. No entanto, certas características unificadoras são comuns a todos os seres vivos. Todos eles usam os mesmos tipos de biomoléculas, e todos eles usam energia. O campo da bioquímica baseia-se em muitas disciplinas, e sua natureza multidisciplinar permite que use resultados de várias ciências para responder a perguntas sobre a natureza molecular de processos de vida. Esta elucidação por sua vez permite estudar a melhor inferência e explicação sobre origens, tanto a origem da vida, como a biodiversidade.

As atividades de uma célula, são semelhantes aos do sistema de transporte de uma cidade.Os carros, ônibus, táxis e correspondem às moléculas envolvidas nas reações (ou série de reações) dentro de uma célula. As rotas percorridas pelos veículos da mesma forma podem ser comparadas com as reações que ocorrem na vida da célula. Note particularmente que muitos veículos viajam mais de uma rota, ou seja,carros e os táxis podem ir para qualquer lugar ao passo que outras, modos mais especializados de transporte, tais como metrôs e bondes, estão confinados a caminhos pre-programados, específicos.
Da mesma forma, algumas moléculas desempenham múltiplos papéis, enquanto outras participam apenas em uma série específica de reações. Além disso, operam simultaneamente; veremos que isso é verdade em muitas reações dentro de uma célula.

As macromoléculas biológicas são informativas. A
sequência de unidades monoméricas no polímero biológico
tem o potencial de conter informação se a ordem
de unidades não é excessivamente repetitiva. Os ácidos nucleicos e
proteínas são macromoléculas informativas; polissacáridos
não são.

Biological macromolecules are informational. The
sequence of monomeric units in a biological polymer
has the potential to contain information if the order
of units is not overly repetitive. Nucleic acids and
proteins are informational macromolecules; polysaccharides
are not.

The activities within a cell are similar to the transportation system of a city.
The cars, buses, and taxis correspond to the molecules involved in reactions
(or series of reactions) within a cell. The routes traveled by vehicles likewise
can be compared to the reactions that occur in the life of the cell. Note particularly
that many vehicles travel more than one route—for instance, cars
and taxis can go almost anywhere—whereas other, more specialized modes of

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

6 Re: Perguntas .... on Fri Dec 18, 2015 7:26 am

Admin


Admin
A organização básica de células. (a) uma célula bacteriana. O exemplo aqui mostrado é típico de uma bactéria tal como a Escherichia coli,
que tem uma membrana exterior. (b) uma célula eucariótica. O exemplo mostrado aqui é uma célula animal típica.

A célula é a unidade básica na biologia. Cada organismo, quer consiste em células ou ela é uma célula única. O avanço desde 1953 com a descoberta da estrutura da hélice dupla do DNA por Francis e Crick nos permitiu compreender melhor como as células são construídas, a genética, e as funções que exercem para permitir a vida. Todas elas condividem o mesmo maquinário e sistema informativo para as funções mais básicas. A vida muda externamente, mas internamente fundamentalmente é similar em todos os organismos. Mediante o estudo e a compreensão das células, suas estruturas e funções podemos apreciar a engenhosidade espetacular de como são feitas, e nos emocionar com este mundo fascinante. Particularmente importante é a natureza dinâmica da célula, que tem a capacidade de crescer, reproduzir, e tornar-se especializada e também a capacidade de responder a estímulos e se adaptar às mudanças no seu ambiente. A convergência da citologia ( estudo das células), genética e bioquímica fez da biologia celular moderna uma das mais emocionantes disciplinas dinâmicas em toda a biologia. Não só isso. Este conhecimento nos permite levantar questões sobre as possibilidades e probabilidades da vida ser explicada melhor mediante meras reações químicas naturais aleatórias ou evolutivas, ou se um projeto é mais provável. Nós iremos tentar providenciar respostas também a estas questões. Se este texto ajuda você a apreciar as maravilhas e diversidade das funções celulares e o ajuda a experimentar a emoção de descoberta, e ajudar a certeza de que um criador extraordinariamente inteligente e poderoso existe, e foi o responsável para a criação do universo e da vida em especial, um dos nossos principais objetivos ao escrever este livro terá sido cumprido.



View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

7 Re: Perguntas .... on Fri Dec 18, 2015 7:49 am

Admin


Admin
Características gerais dos cromossomos

Genes estão localizados fisicamente dentro de cromossomos. Bioquimicamente, cada cromossomo contém um segmento muito longo de DNA, que é o material genético, e proteínas, que são ligadas ao DNA , que permitem uma estrutura organizada. Em células eucarióticas, este complexo entre o DNA e as proteínas é chamado de cromatina.

As bactérias e archaea são referidas como procariotas, a partir do significado prenucleus no grego, porque os seus cromossomas não estão contidos dentro de um núcleo ligado à membrana da célula. Procariotas geralmente têm um tipo de único cromossoma circular numa região do citoplasma chamado nucleóide (Figura 1.1a). O citoplasma é delimitado por uma  membrana de plasma que regula a absorção de nutrientes e a excreção de produtos residuais. Do lado de fora da membrana de plasma tem uma parede celular rígida que protege a célula de ruptura. Certas espécies de bactérias também têm uma membrana exterior situada para além da parede celular.

Eucariotas, que significa  núcleo verdadeiro no grego, inclue algumas espécies simples, tais como protistas unicelulares e alguns fungos (tais como levedura), e espécies multicelulares complexos,  como plantas, animais, humanos, fungos e outros. As células de espécies eucariotas têm membranas internas que delimitam compartimentos altamente especializados (Figura 1.1b). Estes compartimentos formam organelas ligadas à membrana, com funções específicas. Por exemplo, os lisossomas desempenham um papel na degradação de macromoléculas. O retículo endoplasmático e do corpo de Golgi desempenham um papel na modificação de proteínas e tráfico. Uma organela particularmente notável é o núcleo, que é delimitado por duas membranas que constituem o envelope nuclear. A maior parte do material genético é encontrado dentro de cromossomos que estão localizados no núcleo. Em adição ao núcleo, determinadas organelas em células eucarióticas contem uma pequena quantidade do seu próprio DNA. Estas incluem a mitocôndria, que funciona na síntese de ATP, e, em células de plantas, o cloroplasto, que funciona na fotossíntese. O DNA encontrado nestas organelas é referido como DNA ou extranuclear ou extracromossômico para distingui-lo a partir do DNA que é encontrado no núcleo das células. Espécies eucarióticas contêm  material genético que vem em conjuntos de cromossomos lineares.

Cromossomos eucarióticas são herdadas em conjuntos

A maioria das espécies eucariotas são diplóides ou tem uma fase diplóide para seu ciclo de vida, o que significa que cada tipo de cromossoma é um membro de um par. Uma célula diplóide tem dois conjuntos de cromossomos. Dentro de seres humanos, a maioria das células somáticas têm 46 cromossomos e dois conjuntos de 23 cada. Outras espécies diplóides, no entanto, têm diferentes números de cromossomos nas suas células somáticas. Por exemplo, o cachorro tem 39 cromossomos por jogo (78 no total), a mosca da fruta tem 4 cromossomos por conjunto (8 total), e o tomate tem 12 por jogo (24 no total).

Quando uma espécie é diplóide, os membros de um par de cromossomos são chamados homólogos; cada tipo de cromossomo encontra-se em um par homólogo. Como mostrado na Figura 1.2c, para exemplo, uma célula somática humana tem duas cópias do cromossoma 1, duas cópias do cromossoma 2, e assim por diante. Dentro de cada par, o cromossoma do lado esquerdo é um homólogo de um sobre o direito, e vice-versa. Em cada par, um cromossomo foi herdado da mãe e do seu homólogo foi herdado do pai. Os dois cromossomos em um par homólogo são quase idênticos em tamanho, têm o mesmo padrão de bandas, e contêm uma composição semelhante do material genético. Se um determinado gene

encontra-se em uma cópia de um cromossoma, é também  encontrado no outro homólogo. No entanto, os dois homólogos podem transportar diferentes alelos de um determinado gene.

is found on one copy of a chromosome, it is also found on the
other homolog. However, the two homologs may carry different
alleles of a given gene.

Como exemplo, vamos considerar um gene em seres humanos, chamado OCA2, que é um dos poucos genes diferentes que afetam a cor dos olhos. O gene OCA2 está localizado no cromossoma 15 e vem em variantes que resultam em olhos nas cores  marrom, verde ou azul. Em uma pessoa com olhos castanhos, uma cópia do cromossomo 15 pode transportar um alelo marrom dominante, ao passo que o seu homólogo podia levar um alelo recessivo azul. No nível molecular, o quão semelhantes são cromossomos homólogos? A resposta é que a seqüência de bases de um homólogo normalmente uma diferença inferior a 1% em relação à sequência de outro homólogo. Por exemplo, a sequência de DNA do cromossoma 1 que você herdou de sua mãe seria mais  que 99% idêntico à sequência do cromossoma 1 que você herdou de seu pai. No entanto, deve ser enfatizado
as sequências que não são idênticas. As pequenas diferenças em sequências de DNA que proporcionam as diferenças alélicas nos genes. Mais uma vez, se usamos o gene da cor dos olhos, como um exemplo, uma pequena diferença na sequência de DNA distingue os alelos marrom, verde e azul. Isto também deve-se notar que as semelhanças marcantes entre cromossomos homólogos não se aplicam ao par de cromossomos de sexo  X e Y. Estes cromossomos diferem em tamanho e composição genética. Certos genes que são encontrados no cromossoma X não são encontrados no cromossoma Y, e vice-versa. Os cromossomos X e Y não são considerados cromossomos homólogos mesmo embora eles têm regiões curtos de homologia.

Divisão das células

Uma finalidade da divisão celular é a reprodução assexuada. Neste processo, a célula preexistente se divide  para produzir duas novas células. Por convenção, a célula original é normalmente chamada de célula mãe, e as novas células são as duas células filha. Quando as espécies são unicelulares, a célula mãe é julgada ser um indivíduo, e as duas células filhas são dois novos organismos separados.  A reprodução assexuada é a forma como as células de bactérias proliferam. Além disso, certos unicelulares eucariotas , tais como a ameba e o  fermento de padeiro (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), podem  reproduzir assexuadamente.

Uma segunda razão importante para a divisão celular é a multicelularidade. Espécies como plantas, animais, fungos,  e alguns protistas são derivadas de uma única célula que se submeteu a repetidas divisões celulares. Os seres humanos, por exemplo, começam com um único ovo fertilizado; divisões celulares repetidas produzem um adulto com trilhões
de células. A transmissão precisa de cromossomos durante cada divisão celular é crítica de modo a que todas as células do organismo recebem a quantidade correta de material genético.

Em bactérias,  que tem um único cromossoma circular, o processo de divisão é relativamente simples. Antes a divisão celular, as bactérias duplicam seu cromossomo circular; Eles, então, distribuem uma cópia em cada uma das duas células filhas. Este processo é conhecido como fissão binária. Eucariotas tem vários  cromossomos que existem em conjuntos. Em comparação com as bactérias, esta complexidade adicional requer um processo  de separação mais complicado  para assegurar que cada uma das células recentemente feitas recebem o número e tipos de cromossomos corretos. Um mecanismo conhecido como mitose envolve a organização e distribuição de cromossomas eucarióticos durante a divisão celular.

As bactérias se reproduzem assexuadamente por fissão binária. Espécies de bactérias são normalmente unicelulares, embora as bactérias individuais podem associar-se uns aos outros para formar pares, correntes, ou aglomerados. Ao contrário de eucariotas, que têm seus cromossomos em um núcleo separado, cromossomos  circulares de bactérias estão em contato direto com o citoplasma. A capacidade das bactérias para dividir é realmente bastante surpreendente. Algumas espécies, tais como Escherichia coli, uma bactéria comum do intestino, pode dividir a cada 20 a 30 minutos. Antes da célula dividir, as células bacterianas copiam ou replicam os seus cromossomos DNA. Isto produz duas cópias idênticas do material genético, conforme mostrado no topo da figura 2.1.

Cromossoma bacteriano
(já replicado)

Proteína FtsZ 

Fissão binária: O processo pelo qual as células bacterianas se dividem. Antes da divisão, o cromossoma replica para produzir
duas cópias idênticas. Estas duas cópias segregam uma da outra, cada cópia se tornando uma célula filha.

Seguindo a replicação do DNA, uma célula bacteriana divide em duas células filhas por um processo conhecido como fissão binária. Durante este evento, as duas células filhas
tornam-se separadas uma da outra pela formação de um septo. Como se vê na figura 2.1, cada célula recebe uma cópia cromossômica de material genético. Exceto quando ocorrem mutações raras, as células filhas normalmente são geneticamente idênticas, pois elas contêm cópias exactas do material genético da célula mãe. Evidências recentes têm mostrado que as espécies bacterianas produzem uma proteína chamada FtsZ, o que é importante para a divisão celular. Esta proteína se junta em um anel no futuro local do septo. FtsZ é provavelmente a primeira proteína a se deslocar para esse local de divisão, e recruta outras proteínas que produzem uma nova parede de célula entre as células filhas. FtsZ é  relacionada a uma proteína eucariota chamada tubulina. Tubulina é a principal componente dos microtúbulos, os quais desempenham um papel chave na separação dos cromossomos em meiose e mitose  em eucariotas. FtsZ é a homóloga das tubulinas. Tubulinas  são as proteínas que compõem os microtúbulos. nas células eucarióticas. Os microtúbulos formam o cytoesqueleto, que pode ser comparado  a vigas estruturais de galpões.  Além de que microtúbulos  desempenham papéis fundamentais na divisão celular.
Fissão binária é uma forma de reprodução assexuada, porque não envolve contribuições genéticas de dois gametas diferentes. Na ocasião, as bactérias podem trocar pequenos pedaços de genética materiais uns com os outros.


As células eucarióticas  produzem células filhas geneticamente idênticas mediante o ciclo celular

O resultado comum de divisão celular eucariótica é produzir duas células-filhas que têm o mesmo número e  tipos de cromossomos como a célula mãe original. Isto requer uma replicação e processo de divisão que é mais complicado do que o processo  de fissão binária nas células procariotas. As células eucarióticas  dividem progressivamente através de uma série de fases conhecidas como  ciclo celular

Figura 2.2. O ciclo celular eucariótico. Células se dividindo progridem através de uma série de fases, denotadas G1, S, G2 e fase M . este diagrama mostra a progressão de uma célula através de mitose para produzir duas células filhas. A célula diploide original tinha três pares de cromossomos, para um total de seis cromossomos individuais. Durante a fase S, estes  replicaram para produzir 12 cromatídieos encontrados em seis pares de cromatídieos irmãos. Após a mitose e citocinese estar concluída, cada uma das duas células filhas contém seis cromossomos individuais, assim como a célula mãe. Nota: Os cromossomos em G0, G1, S, G2 e as fases não são condensados. Neste desenho, são mostrados parcialmente condensados de modo que eles podem ser facilmente contados.

The eukaryotic cell cycle. Dividing cells progress through a series of phases, denoted G1, S, G2, and M phases. This diagram
shows the progression of a cell through mitosis to produce two daughter cells. The original diploid cell had three pairs of chromosomes, for a total of
six individual chromosomes. During S phase, these have replicated to yield 12 chromatids found in six pairs of sister chromatids. After mitosis and
cytokinesis are completed, each of the two daughter cells contains six individual chromosomes, just like the mother cell. Note: The chromosomes in
G0, G1, S, and G2 phases are not condensed. In this drawing, they are shown partially condensed so they can be easily counted.

Essas fases são nomeados G para lacuna, S para a síntese (do material genético ), e M para a mitose. Existem duas fases G: G1 e G2. O termo "gap" originalmente descrevia as lacunas entre a fase S e a mitose em que não foi aparente que microscopicamente ocorriam alterações significativas na célula. No entanto, nós agora sabemos que ambas as fases de intervalo são períodos críticos no ciclo celular que envolve muitas alterações moleculares. Em células que se dividem ativamente, as fases G1, S, e G2  são conhecidas coletivamente como interfase. Além disso, as células podem permanecer permanentemente, ou por longos períodos de tempo, numa fase do ciclo celular chamado G0. Uma célula na fase G0 ou  temporariamente não progrede ao longo do ciclo celular ou, no caso das células terminalmente diferenciadas, tais como na maioria das  células nervosas
em um mamífero adulto, nunca vão dividir novamente.

Durante a fase G1, uma célula pode preparar-se para dividir. dependendo do tipo de célula e das condições em que se encontra,  uma célula na fase G1 pode acumular alterações moleculares (por exemplo, síntese de proteínas) que fazem com que ela progride no resto do ciclo da célula. Quando isto ocorre, os biólogos  dizer que uma célula atingiu
um ponto de restrição e está empenhada em um caminho que leva à divisão celular. Uma vez passado o ponto de restrição, a célula irá então avançar para a fase S, durante a qual os cromossomos são replicados. Após a replicação, as duas cópias são chamadas de cromátides. Elas são unidas uma à outra numa região do DNA  chamada centrômero
para formar uma unidade conhecida como um par de cromatídios irmãos.


Centrômero
(DNA que é
escondida sob
o cinetocoro)

Cinetocoro
(proteína anexada
ao centrômero)

Um par de cromossomos  homólogos

During the G1 phase, a cell may prepare to divide. Depending
on the cell type and the conditions that it encounters, a cell in
the G1 phase may accumulate molecular changes (e.g., synthesis
of proteins) that cause it to progress through the rest of the cell
cycle. When this occurs, cell biologists say that a cell has reached
a restriction point and is committed on a pathway that leads to
cell division. Once past the restriction point, the cell will then
advance to the S phase, during which the chromosomes are replicated.
After replication, the two copies are called chromatids.
They are joined to each other at a region of DNA called the centromere
to form a unit known as a pair of sister chromatids

Cromossomos após a replicação do DNA.
(a) A fotomicrografia da direita mostra um cromossomo em um formulário chamado um par de cromátides irmãs. Este cromossoma está em fase de metáfase da mitose. Note: Cada um dos 46 cromossomos que são vistos em um cariótipo humano (superior esquerda) é na verdade um par de cromátides irmãs. Olhe atentamente para as caixas retangulares brancas nas duas inserções.
(b) Um desenho esquemático de cromátides irmãs. Esta estrutura tem dois cromatídios que se encontram lado a lado. Como se pode ver aqui, cada cromatita é uma unidade distinta. Os dois cromatídios são mantidos juntos por cinetocoros, proteínas que se ligam umas  as outras e aos centrômeros de cada cromatídio.

Chromosomes following DNA replication. (a) The photomicrograph on the right shows a chromosome in a form called a pair
of sister chromatids. This chromosome is in the metaphase stage of mitosis, which is described later in the chapter. Note: Each of the 46 chromosomes
that are viewed in a human karyotype (upper left) is actually a pair of sister chromatids. Look closely at the white rectangular boxes in the two insets.
(b) A schematic drawing of sister chromatids. This structure has two chromatids that lie side by side. As seen here, each chromatid is a distinct unit.
The two chromatids are held together by kinetochore proteins that bind to each other and to the centromeres of each chromatid.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

8 Re: Perguntas .... on Sun Dec 20, 2015 8:40 pm

Admin


Admin
The polar microtubules project toward the region where the chromosomes will be found during mitosis—the region between the two spindle poles. Polar microtubules that overlap with each other play a role in the separation of the two poles. They help to “push” the poles away from each other. Finally, the kinetochore microtubules have attachments to a kinetochore, which is a complexof proteins that is bound to the centromere of individual chromosomes. As seen in the inset to Figure 3.7, the kinetochore proteins form three layers. The proteins of the inner plate make direct contact with the centromeric DNA, whereas the outer
plate contacts the kinetochore microtubules. The role of the
middle layer is to connect these two regions.
The mitotic spindle allows cells to organize and separate
chromosomes so that each daughter cell receives the same complement
of chromosomes. This sorting process, known as mitosis,
is described next.

Os microtúbulos polares projetam para a região em que os cromossomos serão encontrados durante a mitose-a região entre os dois pólos do fuso. Microtúbulos polares se sobrepõem um ao outro com a tarefa de separar dos dois pólos. Eles ajudam a "empurrar" os polos para se afastarem um do outro. Finalmente, os microtúbulos cinetocoros têm anexos a um cinetocoro, que é um complexo protéico que é vinculado ao centrômero dos cromossomos individuais. Como pode ser visto na inserção à Figura 2.4, as proteínas cinetocoros formam três camadas. As proteínas da placa interior fazem contato direto com o DNA centromérico, enquanto que as exteriores fazem  contato com a placa dos microtúbulos cinetocoros. O papel da camada do meio é conectar essas duas regiões. O fuso mitótico permite que as células se organizam e separam os cromossomos de modo a que cada célula filha recebe o mesmo complemento
de cromossomos. Este processo de apartação, conhecido como a mitose, é descrito a seguir.

The Transmission of Chromosomes During
the Division of Eukaryotic Cells Requires
a Process Known as Mitosis

A transmissão dos cromossomos durante a a divisão de células eucarióticas requer um processo conhecido como mitose

In Figure 3.8, the process of mitosis is shown for a diploid animal
cell. In the simplified diagrams shown along the bottom of
this figure, the original mother cell contains six chromosomes;
it is diploid (2n) and contains three chromosomes per set (n =
3). One set is shown in blue, and the homologous set is shown
in red. As discussed next, mitosis is subdivided into phases
known as prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and
telophase.

Na Figura 2.5, o processo de mitose é mostrado para uma célula de um animal diploide. Nos diagramas simplificados apresentados ao longo do fundo desta figura, a célula mãe original contém seis cromossomos; um é diplóide (2n) e contém três cromossomos por conjunto (n = 3). Um conjunto é mostrado em azul, e o conjunto homóloga é mostrado em vermelho. Conforme discutido a seguir, a mitose é subdividida em fases conhecido como prophase, prometáfase, metáfase, anáfase, e telophase.


The process of mitosis in an animal cell. The top panels illustrate cells of a fish embryo progressing through mitosis.
The chromosomes are stained in blue and the spindle is green. The bottom panels are schematic drawings that emphasize the sorting
and separation of the chromosomes. In this case, the original diploid cell had six chromosomes (three in each set). At the start of mitosis,
these have already replicated into 12 chromatids. The final result is two daughter cells each containing six chromosomes.

O processo de mitose em uma célula animal. Os painéis superiores ilustram células de um embrião de peixe progredindo através de mitose.
Os cromossomos são corados em azul e do fuso é verde. Os painéis de fundo são desenhos esquemáticos que enfatizam a classificação
e separação dos cromossomos. Neste caso, a célula diploide original tinha seis cromossomos (três em cada conjunto). No início da mitose,
estes já foram replicados em 12 chromatídeos. O resultado final é duas células-filhas, cada uma contendo seis cromossomos.


Na mitose, a prófase caracteriza-se pela individualização dos cromossomas duplicados no interior do núcleo, pelo aparecimento do fuso mitótico e pela decomposição da membrana nuclear (carioteca) e é o início da mitose. Acontece duplicação dos centriolos e formação dos fusos e aster.
É a etapa mais longa da mitose. As cromatinas espiralizam-se, tornando-se progressivamente mais condensadas, curtas e grossas, formando os cromossomos. Os centrossomos (dois pares de centríolos) afastam-se para polos opostos, formando entre eles o fuso acromático. O fuso acromático (ou fuso mitótico) é formado por feixes de fibrilas de microtúbulos proteicos, que são feitos de tubulina.[1]

No final da prófase, o(s) nucléolo(s) desaparece(m) e o invólucro nuclear desagrega-se.[2] [3]

a prófase tem 5 subfases mas a sua principal é o paquiteno que ocorre a troca de cromossomos fazendo com que não fiquem com a mesma genetica.


Prophase Antes da mitose, as células estão em interfase, durante a qual os cromossomos são descondensados -menos bem compactado e encontrada no núcleo (Figura 2.5a). No início da mitose, na prófase, os cromossomos já replicaram para produzir 12 chromatídeos, se juntaram como seis pares  cromatídeos irmãs (Figura 2.5B). À medida que a prófase procede, a membrana nuclear começa a dissociar-se em pequenas vesículas. Ao mesmo tempo, as cromatídeos condensam em estruturas mais compactas que são facilmente visíveis por microscópios. O fuso mitótico também começa a se formar e nucléolo desaparece. 

Prometáfase Como mitose progride de prophase para prometáfase, os centrossomos  movem para as extremidades opostas da célula e demarcam dois pólos do eixo, para dentro de cada um das futuras
células-filhas. Uma vez que a membrana nuclear está dissociada em vesículas, as fibras do fuso podem interagir com os cromatídeos irmãos. Esta interação ocorre numa fase de mitose chamada prometaphase (Figura 2.5c). Como tornam-se cromátideos irmãos ligados ao eixo? Inicialmente, os microtúbulos são formados rapidamente e podem ser vistos que crescem fora a partir dos dois pólos. À medida que crescem, se
o fim de um microtúbulo  faz contacto com um centrómero, seu fim se diz ser "capturado" e é ligado fortemente  ao cinetocoro. Este processo aleatório é como cromatídeos  irmãos se apegam a  microtúbulos de cinetocoros. Alternativamente, se a extremidade de um dos microtúbulos não colide com um centrómero, os microtúbulos eventualmente despolimerizam e se retraem para o centrossoma. Como o fim de prometáfase se aproxima, o cinetocoro em um par de cromátideos irmãs é ligado a microtúbulos-cinetocoros em pólos opostos. Como esses eventos estão ocorrendo, os cromátideos irmãos são vistos a passar por movimentos espasmódicos como eles são puxadso para frente  e para trás, entre os dois pólos. No final de prometáfase, o fuso mitótico é completamente formada.


Anaphase The next step in the division process occurs during
anaphase (Figure 3.8e). At this stage, the connection that is responsible
for holding the pairs of chromatids together is broken. (We
will examine the process of sister chromatid cohesion and separation
in more detail in Chapter 10 .) Each chromatid, now an individual
chromosome, is linked to only one of the two poles. As anaphase
proceeds, the chromosomes move toward the pole to which
they are attached. This involves a shortening of the kinetochore
micro tubules. In addition, the two poles themselves move farther
apart due to the elongation of the polar microtubules, which slide
in opposite directions due to the actions of motor proteins.

Anafase O passo seguinte no processo de divisão ocorre durante anafase (Figura 2.5e). Nesta fase, a ligação que é responsável para a manter os pares de cromatídeos juntos é quebrada. Cada cromatídeo, agora um cromossoma indivídual, está ligado  apenas a um dos dois pólos. Como anaphase procede, os cromossomos se movem em direção ao pólo para o qual estão ligados. Trata-se de um encurtamento dos microtúbulos-cinetocoros. Além disso, os dois pólos distanciam-se um do outro devido ao alongamento dos microtúbulos polares, que deslizam em sentidos opostos devido às ações de proteínas motoras.

Metaphase Eventually, the pairs of sister chromatids align
themselves along a plane called the metaphase plate. As shown
in Figure 3.8d, when this alignment is complete, the cell is in
metaphase of mitosis. At this point, each pair of chromatids is
attached to both poles by kinetochore microtubules. The pairs of
sister chromatids have become organized into a single row along
the metaphase plate. When this organizational process is finished,
the chromatids can be equally distributed into two daughter cells.

Metaphase Eventualmente, os pares de cromatídees irmãos se alinham ao longo de um plano chamado de placa metafásica. Como mostrado na Figura 2.5d, quando este alinhamento estiver completo, a célula está em metáfase da mitose. Neste ponto, cada par de cromatídeos é anexado a ambos os pólos por microtúbulos-cinetocoros. Os pares de cromatídeos irmãos estão organizados em uma única linha ao longo da placa metafásica. Quando este processo estiver concluso, os cromatídeos podem ser distribuídos igualmente para duas células filhas.

Telophase During telophase, the chromosomes reach their
respective poles and decondense. The nuclear membrane now
re-forms to produce two separate nuclei. In Figure 3.8f, this has
produced two nuclei that contain six chromosomes each. The
nucleoli will also reappear.


Telophase Durante telophase, os cromossomos atingem os seu
respectivos pólos e descondensam-se . A membrana nuclear agora
re-forma para produzir dois núcleos separados. Na Figura 2.5f, isto produziu  dois núcleos que contêm seis cromossomos cada. o
nucléolo também irá reaparecer.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

9 Re: Perguntas .... on Sun Dec 20, 2015 11:18 pm

Admin


Admin
Cytokinesis In most cases, mitosis is quickly followed by cytokinesis,
in which the two nuclei are segregated into separate
daughter cells. Likewise, cytokinesis also segregates cell organelles
such as mitochondria and chloroplasts into daughter cells.
In animal cells, cytokinesis begins shortly after anaphase . A
contractile ring, composed of myosin motor proteins and actin
filaments, assembles adjacent to the plasma membrane. Myosin
hydrolyzes ATP, which shortens the ring and thereby constricts
the plasma membrane to form a cleavage furrow that ingresses,
or moves inward (Figure 3.9a) . Ingression continues until a
midbody structure is formed that physically pinches one cell
into two.
In plants, the two daughter cells are separated by the formation
of a cell plate (Figure 3.9b). At the end of anaphase,
Golgi-derived vesicles carrying cell wall materials are transported

to the equator of a dividing cell. These vesicles are directed to
their location via the phragmoplast, which is composed of parallel
aligned microtubules and actin filaments that serve as tracks
for vesicle movement. The fusion of these vesicles gives rise to
the cell plate, which is a membrane-bound compartment. The
cell plate begins in the middle of the cell and expands until it
attaches to the mother cell wall. Once this attachment has taken
place, the cell plate undergoes a process of maturation and eventually
separates the mother cell into two daughter cells.

A citocinese Na maioria dos casos, a mitose é rapidamente seguida por citocinese em que os dois núcleos são segregados em células-filhas separadas. Da mesma forma, citocinese também segrega organelas celulares tais como mitocôndrias e cloroplastos nas células-filhas. Nas células animais, citocinese começa logo após a anafase. Um anel contrátil, composto por proteínas motoras miosina e filamentos de actina, monta adjacente à membrana plasmática. Miosina hidrolisa ATP, que encurta o anel e, assim contrai a membrana de plasma para formar um sulco de clivagem, que ingressa, ou se move para dentro (Figura 2.6a). O ingresso continua até que uma estrutura na secção central é formada que aperta fisicamente uma célula em duas. Nas plantas, as duas células filhas são separadas pela formação de uma placa de células (Figura 2.6b). No final da anafase, vesículas derivadas de Golgi que transportam materiais de parede celular se direcionam e viajam ao equador de uma célula em divisão. Estas vesículas são dirigidas para a sua localização através da fragmoplasto, o qual é composto de microtúbulos paralelos e filamentos de actina alinhados  servem como faixas para o movimento da vesícula. A fusão destas vesículas dá origem a placa de células, que é um compartimento ligado à membrana. A
placa de células começa no meio da célula e se expande até se fixar à parede da célula mãe. Uma vez que a placa está fixada, a placa de células é submetida a um processo de maturação e eventualmente separa a célula mãe em duas células filhas.

Citocinese em uma célula animal e vegetal. 
(a) Em uma célula animal, citocinese envolve a formação de um sulco de clivagem.
(b) Numa célula de planta, citocinese ocorre através da formação de uma placa de células
entre as duas células filhas.

Outcome of mitotic cell division Mitosis and cytokinesis
ultimately produce two daughter cells having the same number
of chromosomes as the mother cell. Barring rare mutations, the
two daughter cells are genetically identical to each other and to
the mother cell from which they were derived. The critical consequence
of this sorting process is to ensure genetic consistency
from one somatic cell to the next. The development of multicellularity
relies on the repeated process of mitosis and cytokinesis.
For diploid organisms that are multicellular, most of the somatic
cells are diploid and genetically identical to each other.

Resultado da divisão celular mitótica Mitose e citocinese
produzem duas células-filhas com o mesmo número
de cromossomos da célula-mãe. Exceto raras mutações, as
duas células filhas são geneticamente idênticas umas às outras e a
célula-mãe a partir da qual foram derivadas. A consequência crítica
deste processo de separação é para assegurar a consistência genética
a partir de uma célula somática para a próxima. O desenvolvimento de organismos multicelulares
baseia-se no processo repetido de mitose e citocinese.
Para os organismos que são diploides multicelular, a maioria das células somáticas
são diplóides e geneticamente idênticas umas das outras.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

10 Re: Perguntas .... on Tue Dec 22, 2015 4:58 am

Admin


Admin
Na Figura 2.7. Cross Over ocorreu em um único local entre dois dos cromatídios maiores. A ligação que resulta no cruzamento é chamado de quiasma. No final da fase de diplóteno, o complexo  sinaptonêmico desaparece em grande parte. O bivalente se separa ligeiramente, e no microscópio fica mais fácil de ver que ele é na verdade composto de quatro cromátides. Um bivalente é também chamado de tétrade (a partir do prefixo "Tetra", que significa quatro) porque ele é composto de quatro cromátides. Na última etapa da prófase da meiose I, diacinese, o complexo sinaptonêmico desaparece completamente.

Prometáfase da meiose I A Figura 2.6. enfatiza o emparelhamento e cross-over que ocorre durante a prófase da meiose I. Na Figura 2.9., voltamos nossa atenção para os acontecimentos gerais em meiose. Profase da meiose I é seguida por prometáfase, em que o aparelho do fuso é completo, e os cromatídios são ligados por meio de microtúbulos cinetocoros.

Metaphase of meiosis I At metaphase of meiosis I, the bivalents
are organized along the metaphase plate. However, their pattern of
alignment is strikingly different from that observed during mitosis
(refer back to Figure 3.8d). Before we consider the rest of meiosis
I, a particularly critical feature for you to appreciate is how the
bivalents are aligned along the metaphase plate. In particular, the
pairs of sister chromatids are aligned in a double row rather than a
single row, as occurs in mitosis. Furthermore, the arrangement of
sister chromatids within this double row is random with regard to
the blue and red homologs. In Figure 3.12, one of the blue homologs
is above the metaphase plate and the other two are below,
whereas one of the red homologs is below the metaphase plate and
other two are above.
In an organism that produces many gametes, meiosis in
other cells could produce a different arrangement of homologs—
three blues above and none below, or none above and three
below, and so on. As discussed later in this chapter, the random
arrangement of homologs is consistent with Mendel’s law of
independent assortment. Because most eukaryotic species have
several chromosomes per set, the sister chromatids can be randomly
aligned along the metaphase plate in many possible ways.
For example, consider humans, who have 23 chromosomes per
set. The possible number of different, random alignments equals
2n, where n equals the number of chromosomes per set. Thus,
in humans, this would equal 223, or over 8 million, possibilities!

Metáfase da meiose I Na metáfase da meiose I, os bivalentes são organizados ao longo da placa metafásica. No entanto, seu padrão de alinhamento é notavelmente diferente do observado durante a mitose ( Figura 2.5d). Antes de considerarmos o resto da meiose I, uma característica particularmente crítica  é a forma como os bivalentes são alinhados ao longo da placa metafásica. Em particular, os pares de cromátides irmãs são alinhados em fila dupla em vez de única, como ocorre na mitose. Além disso, o arranjo de cromátides irmãs dentro desta fila dupla é aleatória no que respeita os homólogos de azul e vermelho. Na Figura 3,12, um dos homólogos de azul
está acima da placa de metafase e os outros dois são abaixo,
Considerando que um dos homólogos vermelhos está abaixo da placa metafásica e
outros dois estão acima.
Em um organismo que produz muitas gâmetas, em meiose
outras células podem produzir um arranjo diferente de homologs-
três azuis acima e nenhum abaixo ou nenhum acima e três
a seguir, e assim por diante. Como discutido mais adiante neste capítulo, o aleatório
arranjo de homólogos é consistente com a lei de Mendel de
segregação independente. Como a maioria das espécies eucarióticas têm
vários cromossomas por set, as cromátides irmãs pode ser aleatoriamente
alinhados ao longo da placa de metafase em muitas maneiras possíveis.
Por exemplo, considere os seres humanos, que têm 23 cromossomos por
conjunto. O número possível de diferentes alinhamentos, aleatório é igual a
2n, onde n é igual ao número de cromossomas por set. Assim,
em seres humanos, isso seria igual a 223, ou mais de 8 milhões, possibilidades!


Because the homologs are genetically similar but not identical,
we see from this calculation that the random alignment of
homologous chromosomes provides a mechanism to promote a
vast amount of genetic diversity.
In addition to the random arrangement of homologs
within a double row, a second distinctive feature of metaphase
of meiosis I is the attachment of kinetochore microtubules to the
sister chromatids (Figure 3.13) . One pair of sister chromatids is
linked to one of the poles, and the homologous pair is linked to
the opposite pole. This arrangement is quite different from the
kinetochore attachment sites during mitosis in which a pair of
sister chromatids is linked to both poles (see Figure 3.Cool.

Uma vez que os homólogos são geneticamente semelhantes mas não idênticos, vemos a partir deste cálculo, que o alinhamento aleatório de cromossomos homólogos fornece um mecanismo para promover uma
grande quantidade de diversidade genética. Em adição ao arranjo aleatório de homólogos dentro de uma linha de casal, uma segunda característica distintiva da metáfase da meiose I é a ligação de cinetocoro-microtúbulos ás 
cromátides irmãs (Figura 2.10.). Um par de cromátides irmãs é ligada a um dos pólos, e o par está ligado ao homólogo do polo oposto. Este arranjo é bastante diferente do cinetocoro local de fixação durante a mitose em que um par de cromátides irmãs está ligado a ambos os pólos (ver Figura 2.5).


Anaphase of meiosis I During anaphase of meiosis I, the two
pairs of sister chromatids within a bivalent separate from each
other (see Figure 3.12). However, the connection that holds sister
chromatids together does not break. Instead, each joined pair
of chromatids migrates to one pole, and the homologous pair of
chromatids moves to the opposite pole.

Anaphase da meiose I Durante anaphase da meiose I, os dois cromatídios pares irmãos  de dentro de um bivalente se separam um do outro outros (veja a Figura 2.9.). No entanto, a ligação que mantém cromátides irmãs
juntos não quebra. Em vez disso, cada par de cromátides juntado migra para um pólo, e o par homólogo de cromátides move  para o pólo oposto.

Telophase of meiosis I Finally, at telophase of meiosis I, the sister
chromatids have reached their respective poles, and decondensation
occurs in many, but not all, species. The nuclear
membrane may re-form to produce two separate nuclei. The
end result of meiosis I is two cells, each with three pairs of
sister chromatids. It is thus a reduction division. The original
diploid cell had its chromosomes in homologous pairs, but the
two cells produced at the end of meiosis I are considered to be
haploid; they do not have pairs of homologous chromosomes.

Telófase da meiose I Finalmente, na telófase da meiose I, as cromátides irmãs atingiram seus respectivos pólos, e descondensação ocorre em muitos, mas não todas as espécies. A membrana nuclear pode reformar-se para produzir dois núcleos separados. O resultado final da meiose I é duas células, cada uma com três pares de cromátides irmãs. É, assim, uma divisão de redução. A célula original diploide teve seus cromossomos em pares homólogos, mas as duas células produzidas no final da meiose I são consideradas haploides; elas não têm pares de cromossomos homólogos.

Meiosis II The sorting events that occur during meiosis II
are similar to those that occur during mitosis, but the starting
point is different. For a diploid organism with six chromosomes,
mitosis begins with 12 chromatids that are joined as six pairs of
sister chromatids (refer back to Figure 2.5). By comparison, the
two cells that begin meiosis II each have six chromatids that are
joined as three pairs of sister chromatids. Otherwise, the steps
that occur during prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase,
and telophase of meiosis II are analogous to a mitotic division.

Meiose II os eventos que ocorrem durante a separação durante a meiose II  são semelhantes aos que ocorrem durante a mitose, mas o ponto de partida é diferente. Para um organismo diplóide com seis cromossomos,
mitose começa com 12 cromátides que são unidos como seis pares de cromátides irmãs (consulte a Figura 2.5). Como comparação, as duas células que começam a meiose II têm cada uma seis  cromátides que são juntadas como três pares de cromátides irmãs. Caso contrário, os passos que ocorrem durante a prófase, prometáfase, metáfase, anáfase, e telofase da meiose II são análogos a uma divisão mitótica.

Meiosis versus mitosis If we compare the outcome of meiosis
(see Figure 3.12) to that of mitosis (see Figure 3.Cool, the results are
quite different. (A comparison is also made in solved problem S3
at the end of this chapter.) In these examples, mitosis produced
two diploid daughter cells with six chromosomes each, whereas
meiosis produced four haploid daughter cells with three chromosomes
each. In other words, meiosis has halved the number of
chromosomes per cell. With regard to alleles, the results of mitosis
and meiosis are also different. The daughter cells produced
by mitosis are genetically identical. However, the haploid cells
produced by meiosis are not genetically identical to each other
because they contain only one homologous chromosome from
each pair. Later, we will consider how the gametes may differ in
the alleles that they carry on their homologous chromosomes.

Meiose comparado com  mitose Se compararmos o resultado da meiose (ver Figura 3.9) com a mitose (ver figura 2.5), os resultados são bem diferentes. Nestes exemplos, a mitose produziu duas células-filhas diploides com seis cromossomos cada, enquanto que meiose produziu quatro células-filhas haploides com três cromossomos cada. Em outras palavras, a meiose diminuiu para metade o número de cromossomos por célula. No que se refere a alelos, os resultados da mitose e meiose também são diferentes. As células filhas produzidas por mitose são geneticamente idênticas. No entanto, as células haploides produzidas por meiose não são geneticamente idênticas umas das outras porque elas contêm apenas um cromossomo homólogo de cada par. Mais tarde, vamos considerar como os gametas podem diferir em os alelos que eles carregam em seus cromossomos homólogos.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

11 Re: Perguntas .... on Wed Dec 23, 2015 11:56 am

Admin


Admin
In Animals, Spermatogenesis Produces Four
Haploid Sperm Cells and Oogenesis Produces
a Single Haploid Egg Cell

Em animais, espermatogênese produz quatro  células de esperma haploides e oogênese produz um único óvulo haplóide

Fixação dos microtúbulos-cinetócoros de cromossomos replicados durante a meiose. Os microtúbulos-cinetocoro estão ligados  a partir de um determinado pólo  a um par de cromatídios em um bivalente, mas não ambos. Portanto, cada par de cromátides irmãs é ligado a um único pólo.

In male animals, spermatogenesis, the production of sperm,
occurs within glands known as the testes. The testes contain
spermatogonial cells that divide by mitosis to produce two cells.
One of these remains a spermatogonial cell, and the other cell
becomes a primary spermatocyte. As shown in Figure 3.14a , the
spermatocyte progresses through meiosis I and meiosis II to produce
four haploid cells, which are known as spermatids. These
cells then mature into sperm cells. The structure of a sperm cell
includes a long flagellum and a head. The head of the sperm
contains little more than a haploid nucleus and an organelle at
its tip, known as an acrosome. The acrosome contains digestive
enzymes that are released when a sperm meets an egg cell. These
enzymes enable the sperm to penetrate the outer protective layers
of the egg and gain entry into the egg cell’s cytosol. In animal
species without a mating season, sperm production is a continuous
process in mature males. A mature human male, for example,
produces several hundred million sperm each day.

Nos animais do sexo masculino, a espermatogênese, a produção de esperma, ocorre dentro de glândulas conhecidas como os testículos. Os testículos contem espermatogônias que dividem mediante mitose para produzir duas células. Uma destas continua a ser uma célula spermatogonial, e a outra célula torna-se um espermatócito primário. Como mostrado na Figura 2.11a, o espermatócito progride através da meiose I e meiose II para produzir quatro células haploides, os quais são conhecidos como espermatídios. Estas células, em seguida, amadurecem em células de esperma. A estrutura de uma célula de esperma inclui um longo flagelo e uma cabeça. A cabeça do esperma contém pouco mais do que um núcleo haploide e em um organelo na sua ponta, há o que é conhecido como um acrossoma. O acrossoma contém enzimas digestivas que são liberadas quando um espermatozoide encontra um óvulo. Estas enzimas permitem que o esperma  penetre as camadas protetoras exteriores do ovo e ganhe acesso ao citoplasma do óvulo. Em espécies de animais sem uma época de acasalamento, a produção de esperma é um processo contínuo de machos maduros. Um macho humano maduro, por exemplo, produz várias centenas de milhões de espermatozoides cada dia.

 Most
of the cytoplasm is retained by the secondary oocyte and very
little by the polar body, allowing the oocyte to become a larger
cell with more stored nutrients. The secondary oocyte then
begins meiosis II. In mammals, the secondary oocyte is released
from the ovary—an event called ovulation—and travels down
the oviduct toward the uterus. During this journey, if a sperm
cell penetrates the secondary oocyte, it is stimulated to complete
meiosis II; the secondary oocyte produces a haploid egg and a
second polar body. The haploid egg and sperm nuclei then unite
to create the diploid nucleus of a new individual.

Nos animais do sexo feminino, oogenesis, a produção de óvulos, ocorre dentro das células diploides especializadas do ovário conhecido como ovogonias. Bastante cedo no desenvolvimento do ovário, o ovogonias
inicia a meiose para produzir oócitos primários. Por exemplo, em seres humanos, cerca de 1 milhão de oócitos primários por ovário são produzidos antes do nascimento. Estes oócitos primários são detidos-
e entram numa fase dormente na prófase da meiose I, mantendo-se nesta  fase até que a fêmea se torna sexualmente madura. Começando nesta fase, oócitos primários são periodicamente ativados para o progresso através das etapas restantes do desenvolvimento do oócito. Durante a maturação do oócito, a meiose produz apenas uma célula que está destinada a tornar-se um ovo, em oposição a quatro gâmetas produzidos a partir de cada espermatócitos primários durante a espermatogênese. Como isso ocorre? Como mostrado na Figura 2.11b, a primeira divisão meiótica é assimétrica  produz um oócito secundário e uma célula muito menor, conhecida como corpo polar. A maior parte do citoplasma é retida pelo oócito secundário e muito pouco pelo corpo polar, permitindo que o oócito se torna  uma célula  maior com mais nutrientes armazenados. O ovócito secundário, em seguida, começa a meiose II. Nos mamíferos, o ovócito secundário é liberado do ovário, um evento chamado de ovulação e viaja para baixo do oviduto para o útero. Durante esta viagem, se uma célula espermatozoide penetra o ovócito secundário, que é estimulado para completar meiose II; o ovócito secundário produz um ovo  haploide  e um segundo corpo polar. O óvulo e o espermatozoide se unem, para criar em seguida, para criar 
o núcleo diplóide de um novo indivíduo.

espermatócito primário (diplóide)

Ovócito primário (diplóide)

Gametogenesis in animals. (a) Spermatogenesis. A diploid spermatocyte undergoes meiosis to produce four haploid (n) spermatids.
These differentiate during spermatogenesis to become mature sperm. (b) Oogenesis. A diploid oocyte undergoes meiosis to produce one ha ploid egg
cell and two or three polar bodies. For some species, the first polar body divides; in other species, it does not. Because of asymmetrical cytokinesis, the
amount of cytoplasm the egg receives is maximized. The polar bodies degenerate.


Gametogênese em animais. (a) Espermatogênese. A espermatócito diploide sofre meiose para produzir quatro (n) espermátides haploides. Estas se diferenciam durante a espermatogênese para se tornar espermatozóides maduros. (b) Oogenesis. Um ovócito diplóide passa por meiose para produzir uma célula ôvulo haploide e dois ou três corpos polares. Para algumas espécies, o primeiro corpo polar divide; em outras espécies, isso não acontece. Devido a citocinese assimétrica, a quantidade de citoplasma que o óvulo recebe é maximizada. Os corpos polares degeneram.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

12 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Dec 24, 2015 8:45 pm

Admin


Admin
Bacterial chromosomal DNA is usually a circular molecule,
though some bacteria have linear chromosomes. A typical
chromo some is a few million base pairs (bp) in length. For example,
the chromosome of one strain of Escherichia coli has approximately
4.6 million bp, and the Haemophilus influenzae chromosome
has roughly 1.8 million bp. A bacterial chromosome
commonly has a few thousand different genes. These genes are
interspersed throughout the entire chromosome (Figure 10.4 ).
Structural genes—nucleotide sequences that encode proteins—
account for the majority of bacterial DNA. The nontranscribed
regions of DNA located between adjacent genes are termed
intergenic regions.
Other sequences in chromosomal DNA influence DNA
replication, gene transcription, and chromosome structure. For
example, bacterial chromosomes have one origin of replication,
a sequence that is a few hundred nucleotides in length. This nucleotide
sequence functions as an initiation site for the assembly of
several proteins required for DNA replication. Also, a variety of
repetitive sequences have been identified in many bacterial species.
These sequences are found in multiple copies and are usually
interspersed within the intergenic regions throughout the bacterial
chromosome. Repetitive sequences may play a role in a variety of
genetic processes, including DNA folding, DNA replication, gene
regulation, and genetic recombination.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

13 Re: Perguntas .... on Mon Jan 04, 2016 11:20 am

Admin


Admin
Nas extremidades dos cromossomps lineares são encontrado regiões especializadas conhecidas como telômeros. Telômeros servem para várias funções importantes na replicação e estabilidade do cromossoma. Os telômeros evitam rearranjos cromossômicos tais como translocações. Além disso, eles impedem o  encurtamento de cromossomos  de duas maneiras. Em primeiro lugar, os telômeros protegem os cromossomos de serem digeridos por meio de enzimas chamadas exonucleases que reconhecem as extremidades do DNA. Em segundo lugar, uma forma incomum de replicação de DNA  pode ocorrer no telômero para assegurar que cromossomos eucarióticos não fiquem encurtados com cada  rodada de replicação do DNA. Genes estão localizados entre regiões  centroméricos e teloméricos ao longo de todo o cromossoma eucariota. Um único cromossomo tem geralmente de algumas centenas a alguns milhares de genes diferentes. A sequência de um gene eucariótico típico é várias milhares a dezenas de milhares de pares de bases de comprimento. Em eucariotas menos complexos  tais como levedura, os genes são relativamente pequenos e contêm principalmente sequências de nucleótidos que codificam as  sequências de aminoácidos de proteínas. Em eucariotas mais complexos tais como mamíferos e plantas floridas, genes estruturais tendem a ser muito mais longos, devido à presença de intrões não codificantes sequências intervenientes. Os intrões variam em tamanho de menos de 100 pb a mais de 10000 pb. Portanto, a presença de grandes intrões pode aumentar muito os comprimentos de genes eucarióticos.

Cromatina eucariótica deve ser compactada para caber dentro da célula

Agora voltamos nossa atenção para as formas que os cromossomos eucariontes são dobrados para caber dentro de uma célula viva. Um cromossoma eucariota típico contém uma única molécula de DNA de cadeia dupla linear, que pode ser de centenas de milhões de pares de bases de comprimento. Se o DNA a partir de um único conjunto de cromossomos humanos for esticado de ponta a ponta, o comprimento seria mais de 1 metro! Por comparação, a maioria das células eucarióticas são apenas 10 a 100 μm de diâmetro, e o núcleo da célula é apenas cerca de 2 a 4 μm de diâmetro. Portanto, o DNA de numa célula eucariótica é dobrada e embalada de maneira extraordinária  para caber dentro do núcleo. A compactação do DNA linear dentro de cromossomos eucarióticos é realizado através de mecanismos que envolvem as interações entre DNA e várias proteínas diferentes. Nos últimos anos, tornou-se cada vez mais evidente que as proteínas ligadas a DNA cromossômico são sujeitas a alterações durante a vida da célula. Estas mudanças na composição das proteínas, por sua vez, afetam o grau de compactação da cromatina. Cromossomos são estruturas muito dinâmicas que alteram entre estados apertado e solto de compactação em resposta a mudanças na composição das proteínas. Vamos considerar em primeiro lugar,  como os cromossomos são compactados e organizados durante interfase-o período do ciclo celular que inclui o G1, S, e fases G2. Mais tarde, examinamos a compactação adicional que é necessária para produzir os cromossomas altamente condensados encontrado na fase M.


DNA linear  envolve em torno de proteínas de histonas  para formar nucleossomos, a unidade estrutural de repetição da cromatina

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

14 Re: Perguntas .... on Mon Jan 04, 2016 5:47 pm

Admin


Admin
Cada octâmero contém oito subunidades histonas, duas cópias de cada uma das quatro diferentes proteínas histona. O DNA encontra-se na superfície e faz 1,65  voltas superhelicais negativas em torno da histona octâmero. A quantidade de DNA necessária para envolver o histona octâmero é 146 ou 147 pb. No seu ponto mais largo, um único nucleossoma é de cerca de 11 nm de diâmetro. A cromatina de células eucarióticas contém um padrão repetitivo em que os nucleossomos são ligados por regiões ligantes de DNA que variam em tamanho de 20 a 100 pb, dependendo da espécie e tipo de célula.Esta estrutura encurta o comprimento da molécula de DNA de cerca de sete vezes. Cada uma das proteínas histona consiste de um domínio globular e um flexível, terminal amino carregada chamado um terminal amino cauda. Proteínas histonas são proteínas básicas, pois eles contêm um grande número de lisina de carga positiva e amino da arginina ácidos. Os resíduos arginina, em particular, desempenham um papel importante na ligação ao o DNA. Argininas dentro das proteínas histona formam interações electrostáticas e de ligação de hidrogênio com os grupos de fosfato ao longo da espinha dorsal do DNA. O octâmero de histonas contém duas moléculas de cada uma das quatro diferentes proteínas histonas H2A:, H2B, H3, e H4. Estas são chamadas as histonas nucleares. Em 1997, Timothy Richmond e colegas determinaram a estrutura de um nucleossoma por cristalografia de raios-X (Figura 3.10b). Uma outra histona, H1, é encontrada na maioria das células eucariotas e chama-se a histona ligante. Ela liga-se ao DNA na região ligante entre nucleossomos e pode ajudar a compactar nucleossomos adjacentes (Figura 3.10c). As histonas ligante ssão  menos firmemente ligadas ao DNA que são as histonas nucleares. Além disso, outras proteínas na região que não são histonas ligantes desempenham um papel na organização e compactação de cromossomos, e sua presença pode  afetar a expressão de genes próximos.

Nucleosomes Become Closely Associated to Form a 30-nm Fiber

Nucleossomos tornam-se intimamente associados para formar uma fibra de 30-nm


Na cromatina eucariótica, nucleossomas associam uns com os outros para formar uma estrutura mais compacta, que é de 30 nm de diâmetro. Os nucleossomos são empacotados em uma unidade mais compacta na qual  H1 tem um papel na a embalagem e compactação dos nucleossomos. No entanto, o papel exato de H1 na compactação da cromatina permanece obscura. Dados recentes sugerem que as histonas nucleares também desempenham um papel-chave na a compactação e relaxamento da cromatina. Unidades de nucleossomos  são organizados em um mais de uma estrutura compacta que é de 30 nm de diâmetro, conhecida como fibra de  30-nm (Figura 3.11a). A fibra 30 nm encurta o comprimento total do DNA e de outros modelos sete vezes. A maioria dos modelos para a fibra de 30 nm se dividem em duas classes principais. O modelo solenoide sugere uma estrutura helicoidal em que o contato entre nucleossomos produz uma estrutura compacta simetricamente dentro da fibra de 30 nm (Figura 3.11b). Este tipo de modelo ainda é o preferido por alguns pesquisadores no campo. No entanto, dados experimentais também sugerem que a fibra de 30 nm eventualmente não forma uma  estrutura tão regular. Em vez disso, um modelo alternativo em ziguezague, regiões de ligação dentro da estrutura de 30 nm são variavelmente dobrados e torcidos, e pouco contato face-a-face ocorre entre nucleossomos (Figura 3.11c). Neste nível de compactação, o quadro geral da cromatina que emerge é uma estrutura em ziguezague irregular, oscilando, tridimensional  com unidades de nucleossomas estáveis ​​ligados por regiões ligantes deformáveis.


FIGURA 3,11 A fibra de 30 nm. (a) Uma fotomicrografia da fibra de 30 nm. (b) No modelo de solenoide, os nucleossomas são embalados numa configuração de espiral (c) No modelo em ziguezague, o DNA ligante forma uma estrutura mais irregular, e menos  contato ocorre entre nucleossomas adjacentes. O modelo de ziguezague  é consistente com os dados mais recentes relativos à conformação da cromatina.

Cromossomos são ainda mais compactados ao ancorar as fibras de 30 nm em  domínios de loop radial na matriz nuclear

The internal nuclear matrix, whose structure and functional
role remain controversial, is hypothesized to be an intricate
fine network of irregular protein fibers plus many other proteins
that bind to these fibers. Even when the chromatin is extracted
from the nucleus, the internal nuclear matrix may remain intact
(Figure 10.18b and c). However, the matrix should not be considered
a static structure. Research indicates that the protein
composition of the internal nuclear matrix is very dynamic and
complex, consisting of dozens or perhaps hundreds of different
proteins. The protein composition varies depending on species,
cell type, and environmental conditions. This complexity has
made it difficult to propose models regarding its overall organization.
Further research is necessary to understand the structure
and dynamic nature of the internal nuclear matrix.
The proteins of the nuclear matrix are involved in compacting
the DNA into radial loop domains, similar to those
described for the bacterial chromosome. During interphase,
chromatin is organized into loops, often 25,000 to 200,000 bp in
size, which are anchored to the nuclear matrix. The chromosomal
DNA of eukaryotic species contains sequences called matrixattachment
regions (MARs) or scaffold-attachment regions
(SARs), which are interspersed at regular intervals throughout
the genome. The MARs bind to specific proteins in the nuclear
matrix, thus forming chromosomal loops (Figure 10.18d).

Até agora, examinamos dois mecanismos que compactam o DNA eucariótico. Estes envolvem o envolvimento de DNA dentro nucleossomos e a disposição dos nucleossomos para formar uma fibra de 30 nm. Tomados em conjunto, estes dois acontecimentos encurtam o DNA quase 50 vezes. Um terceiro nível de compactação envolve interações entre as fibras de 30 nm e de uma rede filamentosa de proteínas no núcleo chamado a matriz nuclear. Como mostrado na Figura 3.12a, a matriz nuclear é constituída por duas partes. A lâmina nuclear é um conjunto de fibras que revestem a membrana nuclear interna.Estas fibras são compostas por proteínas de filamentos intermediários. A segunda parte é uma matriz nuclear interna, que está ligada à lâmina nuclear e preenche o interior do núcleo. Em relação a matriz nuclear interna, cuja estrutura e função permanecem controversos,  a hipótese é que uma rede fina intrincada de  fibras des proteínas irregulares, além de muitas outras proteínas, se ligam a essas fibras. Mesmo quando a cromatina é extraída do núcleo, a matriz nuclear interna pode permanecer intacta (Figura 3.11b e c). No entanto, a matriz não deve ser considerada uma estrutura estática. A pesquisa indica que a proteína que compõe a matriz nuclear interna é muito dinâmica e complexa, composta por dezenas ou talvez centenas de proteínas diferentes. A composição das proteínas varia, dependendo da espécie, tipo de célula, e as condições ambientais. Esta complexidade tem dificultado a propor modelos quanto à sua organização como um todo. Mais pesquisas são necessárias para compreender a estrutura e a natureza dinâmica da matriz nuclear interna. As proteínas da matriz nuclear estão envolvidas na compactação
do DNA em domínios de laços radiais, semelhantes aos descritos para o cromossoma bacteriano. Durante a interfase, cromatina é organizado em laços, muitas vezes, de 25.000 a 200.000 pb em tamanho, que são ancoradas à matriz nuclear. O DNA cromossómico de espécies eucarióticas contém as sequências chamadas regiões de ligação à matriz (MARs)  ou regiões de fixação andaime- (SAR), os quais são intercalados com intervalos regulares ao longo do genoma. As MARs ligam nas  proteínas específicas na  matriz nuclear, formando assim laços  cromossômicas (Figura 3.12d).

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

15 Re: Perguntas .... on Wed Jan 06, 2016 7:05 pm

Admin


Admin
Características principais:
• cromossomos eucarióticos são geralmente lineares.
• Um cromossoma típico tem dezenas de milhões até
centenas de milhões de pares de bases de comprimento.
• cromossomos eucarióticos ocorrem em conjuntos.
Muitas espécies são diploides, o que significa que
células somáticas contêm 2 conjuntos de cromossomos.
• Os genes são intercalados em todo o
cromossoma. Um cromossoma típico
contém entre algumas centenas e vários
mil genes diferentes.
• Cada cromossomo contém muitas origens de
replicação que são intercaladas entre todos os
100,000 pares de bases.
• Cada cromossomo contém um centrômero
que forma um local de reconhecimento para as
proteínas cinetócoros.
• Os telômeros contem sequências especializadas
localizada em ambas as extremidades do
cromossoma linear
.• sequências repetitivas são comumente encontradas
em regiões teloméricas, centroméricas, e
também podem ser intercaladas ao longo
o cromossoma.

Key features:
• Eukaryotic chromosomes are usually linear.
• A typical chromosome is tens of millions to
hundreds of millions of base pairs in length.
• Eukaryotic chromosomes occur in sets.
Many species are diploid, which means that
somatic cells contain 2 sets of chromosomes.
• Genes are interspersed throughout the
chromosome. A typical chromosome
contains between a few hundred and several
thousand different genes.
• Each chromosome contains many origins of
replication that are interspersed about every
100,000 base pairs.
• Each chromosome contains a centromere
that forms a recognition site for the
kinetochore proteins.
• Telomeres contain specialized sequences
located at both ends of the linear
chromosome.
• Repetitive sequences are commonly found
near centromeric and telomeric regions, but
they may also be interspersed throughout
the chromosome.

FIGURE 10.18 Structure of the nuclear matrix. (a) This schematic drawing shows the arrangement of the matrix within a cell nucleus. The
nuclear lamina (depicted as yellow filaments) is a collection of fibrous proteins that line the inner nuclear membrane. The internal nuclear matrix is
composed of protein filaments (depicted in green) that are interconnected. These fibers also have many other proteins associated with them (depicted in
orange). (b) An electron micrograph of the nuclear matrix during interphase after the chromatin has been removed. The nucleolus is labeled Nu, and the
lamina is labeled L. (c) At higher magnification, the protein fibers are more easily seen (arrowheads point at fibers). (d) The matrix-attachment regions
(MARs), which contain a high percentage of A and T bases, bind to the nuclear matrix and create radial loops. This causes a greater compaction of eukaryotic
chromosomal DNA.

Figura 3,12 estrutura da matriz nuclear. (a) Este desenho esquemático  mostra o arranjo de uma matriz no interior do núcleo da célula. A
lâmina nuclear (representada como filamentos amarelo) é uma coleção de proteínas fibrosas que revestem a membrana nuclear interna. A matriz nuclear interna é
composta por filamentos de proteínas (representados em verde) que estão interligados. Estas fibras também têm muitas outras proteínas que são associadas (representado na
laranja). (b) Uma micrografia electrónica da matriz nuclear durante a interfase depois da cromatina removida. O nucléolo é rotulado Nu, e a
lâmina é rotulada L. (c) Na maior ampliação, as fibras de proteínas são mais facilmente vistas (setas apontando para as fibras). (d) As regiões  de fixação da matriz
(MARS), que contêm uma elevada percentagem de bases A e T, se ligam à matriz nuclear e criam lacetes radiais. Isto provoca uma compactação maior  do DNA cromossómico eucariótico.

Porque  a fixação de laços radiais à matriz nuclear é tão importante? Em adição à compactação, a matriz nuclear serve para organizar os cromossomas dentro do núcleo. Cada cromossomo
no núcleo da célula está localizado num território cromossomico discreto. Estes territórios podem ser vistos quando células na  interfase são expostos a várias moléculas fluorescentes que
reconhecem sequências específicas em determinados cromossomos. Figura 3.14 ilustra um experimento no qual as células de frango foram expostas a uma mistura de sondas que reconhecem  locais específicos ao longo de vários dos cromossomos maiores encontrados nesta espécie (Gallus gallus). Figura 3.14a mostra os cromossomos em metáfase. As amostras identificam cada tipo de cromossomo em metáfase com uma diferente cor. Figura 3.14b mostra a utilização de sondas durante a mesma  interfase, quando os cromossomos são menos condensados e encontrados no núcleo da célula. Como visto aqui, cada cromossomo ocupa o seu território distinto próprio. Antes de terminar o tema da compactação do cromossomo na interfase , vamos considerar como o nível de compactação de cromossomos na interfase pode variar. Esta variabilidade pode ser vista com uma luz no microscópio e foi observada pela primeira vez pelo sociólogo alemão Emil
Heitz em 1928. Ele cunhou o termo heterocromatina para descrever  as regiões fortemente compactadas de cromossomos. Em geral, estas regiões do cromossomo são transcricionalmente inativas. De comparação, as regiões menos condensadas, conhecidas como eucromatina, refletem domínios que são capazes de transcrição do gene. Em eucromatina, as  fibras de 30-nm radial formam domínios de laço. Em heterocromatina, estes domínios de laços radiais se tornam ainda mais compactados.

FIGURE 10.19 Chromosome territories in the cell nucleus. (a) Several metaphase chromosomes from the chicken were labeled with
chromosome-specific probes. Each of seven types of chicken chromosomes (i.e., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and Z) is labeled a different color. (b) The same probes
were used to label interphase chromosomes in the cell nucleus. Each of these chromosomes occupies its own distinct, nonoverlapping territory within
the cell nucleus. (Note: Chicken cells are diploid, with two copies of each chromosome.)
(Reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd. Cremer, T. & Cremer, C. [2001] Chromosome territories,

FIGURA 3.14 Territórios de cromossomos no núcleo da célula. (a) Vários cromossomas metafásicos a partir da galinha foram marcados com sondas específicas do cromossoma. Cada um dos sete tipos de cromossomas de frango (ou seja, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, e Z) é rotulado uma cor diferente. (b) As mesmas sondas
foram utilizadas para marcar os cromossomos interfase no núcleo da célula. Cada um destes cromossomos ocupa seu próprio território sem sobreposição, dentro do núcleo da célula. (Note: células de galinha são diplóides, com duas cópias de cada cromossomo.)




Figura 3.15 ilustra a distribuição de eucromatina e heterocromatina em um cromossoma eucariota típico durante interfase. O cromossoma contém regiões de ambos heterocromatina
e eucromatina. A heterocromatina é mais abundante na região centromérica  dos cromossomas e, em menor extensão, nas regiões teloméricas. A heterocromatina constitutiva
refere-se a regiões cromossômicas que estão sempre heterocromáticas e permanentemente inativas no que diz respeito a transcrição. Heterocromatina constitutiva normalmente contém  sequências de DNA altamente repetitivas , tal como repetições em série, em vez de sequências de genes. Heterocromatina facultativa refere-se a cromatina que pode, ocasionalmente,
interconverter entre heterocromatina e eucromatina. Um exemplo de heterocromatina facultativa ocorre em fêmeas de mamíferos quando um dos dois cromossomos X é convertido para um Corpo Barr heterocromático. A maior parte dos genes no corpo Barr são transcricionalmente inativos. A conversão de um cromossomo X a heterocromatina ocorre durante o desenvolvimento embrionário das células somáticas do corpo.


Condensin and Cohesin Promote the Formation of Metaphase Chromosomes

When cells prepare to divide, the chromosomes become even
more condensed. This aids in their proper sorting during metaphase.
Figure 10.21 illustrates the levels of compaction that lead
to a metaphase chromosome. During interphase, most of the
chromosomal DNA is found in euchromatin, in which the 30-nm
fibers form radial loop domains that are attached to a protein
scaffold. The average distance that loops radiate from the protein
scaffold is approximately 300 nm. This structure can be further
compacted via additional folding of the radial loop domains
and protein scaffold. This additional level of compaction greatly
shortens the overall length of a chromosome and produces a
diameter of approximately 700 nm, which is the compaction level
found in heterochromatin. During interphase, most chromosomal
regions are euchromatic, and some localized regions, such
as those near centromeres, are heterochromatic.

Quando as células se preparam para dividir, os cromossomos se tornam ainda mais condensados. Isso ajuda na sua triagem adequada durante a metáfase. Figura 3.16 ilustra os níveis de compactação que levam
a um cromossoma metáfase. Durante a interfase, a maior parte do DNA cromossómico é encontrado na eucromatina, em que as fibras de 30-nm formam domínios de laços radiais que estão ligados a uma proteína
andaime. A distância média que circula irradiam a partir da proteína andaime é de aproximadamente 300 nm. Esta estrutura pode ser ainda mais compactada , sendo dobrada adicionalmente mediante domínios de alças radiais e proteínas de andaime. Este nível adicional de compactação encurta muito o comprimento total de um cromossoma e produz um diâmetro de cerca de 700 nm, que é o nível de compactação
encontrado na heterocromatina. Durante a interfase, mais regiões cromossômicas  são eucromatina, e algumas regiões localizadas, tais como os  centrossomos próximos, são heterocromáticos.

A medida que as células entram na fase M, o nível de compactação altera dramaticamente. Até o final da prófase, cromátides irmãs são inteiramente heterocromáticas. Dois cromátides  paralelos têm um
diâmetro maior de cerca de 1400 nm, mas um comprimento muito mais curto em comparação com os cromossomos da interfase. Estes cromossomos metafásicos altamente condensados sofrem pouco a transcrição do gene
porque é difícil para as proteínas de transcrição para aceder
para o ADN compactado. Portanto, a maior atividade transcricional
cessa durante a fase M, embora alguns genes específicos pode ser
transcritas. Fase M é normalmente um curto período do ciclo celular.
Em cromossomas altamente condensados, tais como aqueles encontrados
em metáfase, os loops radiais são altamente compactada e permanecem
ancorado a um andaime, o qual é formado a partir de proteínas não histona
da matriz nuclear. Experimentalmente, os pesquisadores podem
delinear as proteínas nonhistone do andaime que prendem a
laços no lugar. Figura 10.22a mostra um cromossoma humano metafase.
Nesta condição, as laçadas radiais de DNA estão numa
configuração muito compacta. Se este cromossoma é tratada com
uma elevada concentração de sal para remover ambos o núcleo e o ligante
histonas, a configuração altamente compacto é perdida, mas as partes inferiores
das alças alongadas permanecer solidários com o andaime composto
proteínas de nonhistone. Na Figura 10.22b, uma seta aponta
a uma cadeia de ADN alongado que emana da coloração escura
andaime. Notavelmente, o andaime retém a forma do original
cromossoma metaphase mesmo que as fitas de DNA têm
tornar-se muito alongada. Estes resultados ilustram que a estrutura
de cromossomas em metafase é determinada pelo nuclear
proteínas da matriz, que formam o andaime, e por as histonas,
os quais são necessários para compactar os loops radiais.



As cells enter M phase, the level of compaction changes
dramatically. By the end of prophase, sister chromatids are
entirely heterochromatic. Two parallel chromatids have a larger
diameter of approximately 1400 nm but a much shorter length
compared with interphase chromosomes. These highly condensed
metaphase chromosomes undergo little gene transcription
because it is difficult for transcription proteins to gain access
to the compacted DNA. Therefore, most transcriptional activity
ceases during M phase, although a few specific genes may be
transcribed. M phase is usually a short period of the cell cycle.
In highly condensed chromosomes, such as those found
in metaphase, the radial loops are highly compacted and remain
anchored to a scaffold, which is formed from nonhistone proteins
of the nuclear matrix. Experimentally, researchers can
delineate the nonhistone proteins of the scaffold that hold the
loops in place. Figure 10.22a shows a human metaphase chromosome.
In this condition, the radial loops of DNA are in a
very compact configuration. If this chromosome is treated with
a high concentration of salt to remove both the core and linker
histones, the highly compact configuration is lost, but the bottoms
of the elongated loops remain attached to the scaffold composed
of nonhistone proteins. In Figure 10.22b, an arrow points
to an elongated DNA strand emanating from the darkly staining
scaffold. Remarkably, the scaffold retains the shape of the original
metaphase chromosome even though the DNA strands have
become greatly elongated. These results illustrate that the structure
of metaphase chromosomes is determined by the nuclear
matrix proteins, which form the scaffold, and by the histones,
which are needed to compact the radial loops.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

16 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Jan 07, 2016 8:52 pm

Admin


Admin
Condensin and Cohesin Promote the Formation of Metaphase Chromosomes

Condensina e cohesina promovem formação de Cromossomos metáfase

Quando as células se preparam para dividir, os cromossomos se tornam ainda mais condensados. Isso ajuda na sua triagem adequada durante a metáfase. Figura 3.16 ilustra os níveis de compactação que levam a um cromossomo metáfase. Durante a interfase, a maior parte do DNA cromossómico é encontrado na eucromatina, em que fibras de 30-nm formam domínios de laços radiais que estão ligados a uma proteína andaime. A distância média que os laços circulam  a partir da proteína andaime é um raio de aproximadamente 300 nm. Esta estrutura pode ser ainda mais compactada via domínios de laços radiais adicionais dobráveis  e proteínas de andaime. Este nível adicional de compactação  encurta muito o comprimento total de um cromossoma e produz um diâmetro de cerca de 700 nm, que é o nível de compactação encontrado em heterocromatina. Durante a interfase, mais regiões cromossômicos são eucromatina, e algumas regiões localizadas, tais como os próximos centrossomas, são heterocromáticos.  A medida que as células entram na fase M, o nível de compactação altera
dramaticamente. Até o final da prófase, cromátides irmãs são inteiramente heterocromáticas. Dois cromatídios paralelos têm um diâmetro maior de cerca de 1400 nm, mas um comprimento muito mais curto
em comparação com os cromossomos da interfase. Estes cromossomos altamente condensados metafásicos passam pouco a serem transcritos no gene porque é difícil para as proteínas de transcrição de ter acesso ao DNA
compactado. Portanto, a maior atividade transcricional cessa durante a fase M, embora alguns genes específicos podem ser transcritos. A fase M é normalmente um período curto  do ciclo celular.

Os passos na  compactação eucariótica dos cromossomo levando aos cromossomos metáfase.



the structure
of metaphase chromosomes is determined by the nuclear
matrix proteins, which form the scaffold, and by the histones,
which are needed to compact the radial loops.


cells contain two multiprotein complexes called condensin
and cohesin, which play a critical role in chromosomal
condensation and sister chromatid alignment, respectively.
Condensin and cohesin are two completely distinct complexes,
but both contain a category of proteins called SMC
proteins. SMC stands for structural maintenance of chromosomes.
These proteins use energy from ATP to catalyze changes
in chromosome structure. Together with topoisomerases, SMC
proteins have been shown to promote major changes in DNA
structure. An emerging theme is that SMC proteins actively fold,
tether, and manipulate DNA strands. They are dimers that have
a V-shaped structure. The monomers, which are connected at a
hinge region, have two long coiled arms with a head region that
binds ATP (Figure 10.23 ). The length of each monomer is about
50 nm, which is equivalent to approximately 150 bp of DNA.
As their names suggest, condensin and cohesin play different
roles in metaphase chromosome structure. Prior to M phase,
condensin is found outside the nucleus (Figure 10.24 ). However,
as M phase begins, condensin is observed to coat the individual
chromatids as euchromatin is converted into heterochromatin.

As células contêm dois complexos mucoproteicos chamados condensina e cohesina, que desempenham um papel crítico na condensação e alinhamento cromossómico de cromátides irmãs, respectivamente. Condensina e cohesina são dois complexos  completamente distintos, mas ambos contêm uma categoria de proteínas chamadas proteínas SMC. SMC significa manutenção estrutural dos cromossomos ( structural maintenance of chromosomes). Estas proteínas utilizam a energia a partir de ATP para catalisar mudanças da estrutura dos cromossomos. Juntamente com topoisomerases, se mostrou que proteínas SMC promovem grandes alterações na estrutura do DNA. Um tema emergente é que as proteínas SMC dobram ativamente, amarram e manipulam cadeias de DNA. São dímeros que têm uma estrutura em forma de V. Os monômeros, que estão ligados a uma
região dobradiça , têm dois braços em espiral longos com uma região da cabeça que se liga a ATP (figura 3.17). O comprimento de cada monômero é em torno de 50 nm, o que é equivalente a, aproximadamente, 150 pb de DNA. Como seus nomes sugerem, condensina e cohesina tem papeis diferentes  na estrutura metáfase cromossoma. Antes da fase M, condensina é encontrada fora do núcleo (Figura 3.18).

The structure of SMC proteins. This figure
shows the generalized structure of SMC proteins, which are dimers
consisting of hinge, arm, and head regions. The head regions bind and
hydrolyze ATP. Condensin and cohesin have additional protein subunits
not shown here . N indicates the amino terminus. C indicates the carboxyl
terminus.

Figura 3.17 A estrutura de proteínas SMC. Esta figura mostra a estrutura generalizada de proteínas SMC, que são dímeros consistindo em regiões dobradiça, braço e cabeça. As regiões da cabeça ligam e  hidrolisam ATP. Condensina e coesina têm subunidades de proteínas adicionais não mostrado. N indica o terminal amino. C indica o carboxilo terminus.



Contudo, como fase M começa, condensin é observado para revestir o indivíduo
chromatids como euchromatin é convertido em heterocromatina.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

17 Re: Perguntas .... on Fri Jan 08, 2016 3:14 pm

Admin


Admin
Figura 4;4 fornece uma visão geral dos eventos moleculares que ocorrem enquanto um dos dois  garfos de replicação movimenta em torno do cromossomo  bacteriano, e a Tabela 4.1 resume as funções
das principais proteínas envolvidas na replicação do DNA de E. coli. Vamos começar com a separação de cadeias. Para atuar como um modelo para a replicação do DNA, os fios de uma dupla hélice devem separar. Como mencionado anteriormente, a função de helicase de DNA é  quebrar as ligações de hidrogênio entre pares de bases e, assim, desenrolar os fios; esta ação gera um super enrolamento positivo em cada Forquilha de replicação. A enzima  topoisomerase (tipo II), também chamada DNA girase, se desloca em frente da DNA helicase e alivia o  superenrolamento positivo.
Após que as duas cadeias de DNA pai foram separados e o super-enrolamento relaxado, eles devem ser mantidos assim até os fios filha complementares foram feitos. O que impede que as cadeias de DNA voltam a se juntar? A replicação de DNA requer proteínas que se ligam à ligação de cadeia única dos filamentos de DNA parental e impede-os de re-formação de uma dupla hélice. Deste modo, as bases dentro das fitas parentais são mantidos em uma condição exposta que não lhes permite do hidrogênio juntar os  nucleotídeos individuais de volta.


whereas DNA polymerases II, IV, and V play a role in DNA
repair and the replication of damaged DNA.
DNA polymerase III is responsible for most of the DNA
replication. It is a large enzyme consisting of 10 different subunits
that play various roles in the DNA replication process
( Table 11.2 ). The α subunit actually catalyzes the bond formation
between adjacent nucleotides, and the remaining nine
subunits fulfill other functions.

O evento seguinte na replicação do DNA envolve a síntese de fios  curtos de RNA (em vez de DNA) chamado primers de RNA. Estas cadeias de RNA são sintetizadas pela ligação de ribonucleotídios por meio de uma enzima conhecida como primase. Esta enzima sintetiza cadeias curtas de RNA, tipicamente de 10 a 12 nucleótidos de comprimento. Estas cadeias de RNA curtas começam, ou primam  o processo de replicação de DNA. Na costa principal, um único primer é feito na origem de replicação. Na costa de retardamento, múltiplos primers são feitos. Conforme discutido mais tarde, os iniciadores de RNA são, eventualmente removidos. Um tipo de enzima conhecida como a polimerase de DNA é responsável para sintetizar o DNA da cadeia de condução e de retardamento. Esta enzima catalisa a formação de ligações covalentes entre os nucleotídios adjacentes e, assim, faz  as cadeias  novas filhas. Em E. coli, cinco proteínas distintas funcionam como DNA polimerases, denominadas polimerase I, II, III, IV, e V. As polimerases de DNA I e III estão envolvidas na replicação do DNA normal, enquanto polimerases de DNA II, IV, V  desempenham um papel na reparação do DNA e a replicação do DNA danificado. DNA polimerase III é responsável pela maior parte de replicação do DNA. É um grande enzima que consiste de 10 subunidades diferentes que desempenham vários papéis no processo de replicação do DNA (Tabela 4.2). A subunidade α realmente catalisa a formação da ligação entre os nucleótidos adjacentes, e as nove subunidades restantes cumprem outras funções.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

18 Re: Perguntas .... on Sat Jan 09, 2016 3:41 pm

Admin


Admin
16.3 DNA REPAIR

Because most mutations are deleterious, DNA repair systems
are vital to the survival of all organisms. If DNA repair systems
did not exist, spontaneous and environmentally induced mutations
would be so prevalent that few species, if any, would survive.
The necessity of DNA repair systems becomes evident when
they are missing. Bacteria contain several different DNA repair
systems. Yet, when even a single system is absent, the bacteria
have a much higher rate of mutation. In fact, the rate of mutation
is so high that these bacterial strains are sometimes called mutator
strains. Likewise, in humans, an individual who is defective
in only a single DNA repair system may manifest various disease
symptoms, including a higher risk of skin cancer. This increased
risk is due to the inability to repair UV-induced mutations.
Living cells contain several DNA repair systems that can
fix different types of DNA alterations (Table 16.7 ). Each repair
system is composed of one or more proteins that play specific
roles in the repair mechanism. In most cases, DNA repair is a
multistep process. First, one or more proteins in the DNA repair
system detect an irregularity in DNA structure. Next, the abnormality
is removed by the action of DNA repair enzymes. Finally,
normal DNA is synthesized via DNA replication enzymes. In
this section, we will examine several different repair systems that
have been characterized in bacteria, yeast, mammals, and plants.
Their diverse ways of repairing DNA underscore the extreme
necessity for the structure of DNA to be maintained properly.
Damaged Bases Can Be Directly Repaired
In a few cases, the covalent modification of nucleotides by mutagens
can be reversed by specific cellular enzymes. As discussed
earlier in this chapter, UV light causes the formation of thymine
dimers. Bacteria, fungi, most plants, and some animals produce
an enzyme called photolyase that recognizes thymine dimers
and splits them, which returns the DNA to its original condition
(Figure 16.19a ). Photolyases are flavoproteins that contain two
light-sensitive cofactors. The repair mechanism itself requires
light and is known as photoreactivation. This process directly
restores the structure of DNA. Because plants are exposed to
sunlight throughout the day, photolyase is a critical DNA repair
enzyme for many plant species. A protein known as alkyltransferase can remove methyl
or ethyl groups from guanine bases that have been mutagenized
by alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustard and EMS. This
protein is called alkyltransferase because it transfers the methyl
or ethyl group from the base to a cysteine side chain within the
alkyltransferase protein (Figure 16.19b). Surprisingly, this permanently
inactivates alkyltransferase, which means it can be used
only once!
Base Excision Repair Removes a Damaged Base
A second type of repair system, called base excision repair
(BER), involves the function of a category of enzymes known
as DNA N-glycosylases. This type of enzyme can recognize an
abnormal base and cleave the bond between it and the sugar in
the DNA backbone, creating an apurinic or apyrimidinic site
(Figure 16.20 ). Living organisms produce multiple types of
DNA N-glycosylases, each recognizing particular types of abnormal
base structures. Depending on the DNA N-glycosylase,
this repair system can eliminate abnormal bases such as uracil,
3-methyladenine, 7-methylguanine, and pyrimidine dimers. Base
excision repair is particularly important for the repair of oxidative
DNA damage. Figure 16.20 illustrates the general steps involved in DNA
repair via N-glycosylase. In this example, the DNA contains a
uracil in its sequence. This could have happened spontaneously
or by the action of a chemical mutagen. N-glycosylase recognizes
a uracil within the DNA and cleaves (nicks) the bond between
the sugar and base. This releases the uracil base and leaves
behind an apyrimidinic site. This abnormality is recognized
by a second enzyme, AP endonuclease, which makes a cut on
the 5ʹ side.
Following this cut by AP endonuclease, one of three things
can happen. In some species such as E. coli, DNA polymerase I,
which has a 5ʹ to 3ʹ exonuclease activity, removes a DNA segment
containing the abnormal region and, at the same time, replaces
it with normal nucleotides. This process is called nick translation
(although DNA replication, not mRNA translation, actually
occurs). Alternatively, in eukaryotic species such as humans, the
DNA is repaired in two possible ways. DNA polymerase β has
the enzymatic ability to remove a site, which is missing a base,
and then insert a nucleotide with the correct base in its place.
Another possibility is that DNA polymerase б or ε can synthesize
a short segment of DNA, which generates a flap. The flap is then
removed by flap endonuclease, which is described in Chapter 11 .
In all three cases, the final step is carried out by DNA ligase that
closes a gap in the DNA backbone.
Nucleotide Excision Repair Systems
Remove Segments of Damaged DNA
An important general process for DNA repair is the nucleotide
excision repair (NER) system. This type of system can repair
many different types of DNA damage, including thymine dimers,
chemically modified bases, missing bases, and certain types of
crosslinks. In NER, several nucleotides in the damaged strand
are removed from the DNA, and the intact strand is used as a
template for resynthesis of a normal complementary strand. NER
is found in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes, although its molecular
mechanism is better understood in prokaryotic species.
In E. coli, the NER system requires four key proteins, designated
UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, and UvrD, plus the help of DNA
polymerase and DNA ligase. UvrA, B, C, and D recognize and
remove a short segment of a damaged DNA strand. They are
named Uvr because they are involved in Ultraviolet light repair
of pyrimidine dimers, although the UvrA–D proteins are also
important in repairing chemically damaged DNA.
Figure 16.21 outlines the steps involved in the E. coli NER
system. A protein complex consisting of two UvrA molecules
and one UvrB molecule tracks along the DNA in search of damaged
DNA. Such DNA has a distorted double helix, which is
sensed by the UvrA/UvrB complex. When a damaged segment is
identified, the two UvrA proteins are released, and UvrC binds to
the site. The UvrC protein makes cuts in the damaged strand on
both sides of the damaged site. Typically, the damaged strand is
cut eight nucleotides from the 5ʹ end of the damage and four to
five nucleotides away from the 3ʹ end. After this process, UvrD,
which is a helicase, recognizes the region and separates the two
fills in the gap, using the undamaged strand as a template.
Finally, DNA ligase makes the final covalent connection between
the newly made DNA and the original DNA strand.
In eukaryotes, NER systems are thought to operate similarly
to bacterial systems, though more proteins are involved.
Several human diseases are due to inherited defects in genes
involved in NER. These include xeroderma pigmentosum (XP),
Cockayne syndrome (CS), and PIBIDS. (PIBIDS is an acronym
for a syndrome with symptoms that include photosensitivity;
ichthyosis, a skin abnormality; brittle hair; impaired intelligence;
decreased fertility; and short stature.) A common characteristic
in all three syndromes is an increased sensitivity to sunlight
because of an inability to repair UV-induced lesions. Figure
16.22 shows a photograph of an individual with XP. Such individuals
have pigmentation abnormalities, many premalignant
lesions, and a high predisposition to skin cancer. They may also
develop early degeneration of the nervous system.
Genetic analyses of patients with XP, CS, and PIBIDS have
revealed that these syndromes result from defects in a variety
of different genes that encode NER proteins. For example, XP
can be caused by defects in any of seven different NER genes.
In all cases, individuals have a defective NER pathway. In recent
years, several human NER genes have been successfully cloned
and sequenced. Although more research is needed to completely
understand the mechanisms of DNA repair, the identification of
NER genes has helped unravel the complexities of NER pathways
in human cells.
Mismatch Repair Systems Recognize
and Correct a Base Pair Mismatch
Thus far, we have considered several DNA repair systems that
recognize abnormal nucleotide structures within DNA, including
thymine dimers, alkylated bases, and the presence of uracil in the
DNA. Another type of abnormality that should not occur in DNA
is a base mismatch. The structure of the DNA double helix obeys
the AT/GC rule of base pairing. During the normal course of
DNA replication, however, an incorrect nucleotide may be added
to the growing strand by mistake. This produces a mismatch
between a nucleotide in the parental and the newly made strand.
Various DNA repair mechanisms can recognize and remove this
mismatch. For example, as described in Chapter 11 , DNA polymerase
has a 3ʹ to 5ʹ proofreading ability that can detect mismatches
and remove them. However, if this proofreading ability
fails, cells contain additional DNA repair systems that can detect
base mismatches and fix them. An interesting DNA repair system
that exists in all species is the mismatch repair system.
In the case of a base mismatch, how does a DNA repair
system determine which base to remove? If the mismatch is due
to an error in DNA replication, the newly made daughter strand
contains the incorrect base, whereas the parental strand is normal.
Therefore, an important aspect of mismatch repair is that it
specifically repairs the newly made strand rather than the parental
template strand. Prior to DNA replication, the parental DNA
has already been methylated. Immediately after DNA replication,
some time must pass before a newly made strand is methylated.
Therefore, newly replicated DNA is hemimethylated—only the
parental DNA strand is methylated. Hemimethylation provides a
way for a DNA repair system to distinguish between the parental
DNA strand and the daughter strand.
The molecular mechanism of mismatch repair has been
studied extensively in E. coli. As shown in Figure 16.23 , three
proteins, designated MutS, MutL, and MutH, detect the mismatch
and direct the removal of the mismatched base from the newly
made strand. These proteins are named Mut because their absence
leads to a much higher mutation rate than occurs in normal
strains of E. coli. The role of MutS is to locate mismatches. Once
a mismatch is detected, MutS forms a complex with MutL. MutL
acts as a linker that binds to MutH by a looping mechanism. This
stimulates MutH, which is bound to a hemimethylated site, to
make a cut in the newly made, nonmethylated DNA strand. After
the strand is cut, MutU, which functions as helicase, separates the
strands, and an exonuclease then digests the non methylated DNA
strand in the direction of the mismatch and proceeds beyond the
mismatch site. This leaves a gap in the daughter strand that is
repaired by DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. The net result is
that the mismatch has been corrected by removing the incorrect
region in the daughter strand and then resynthesizing the correct
sequence using the parental DNA as a template.
Eukaryotic species also have homologs to MutS and MutL,
along with many other proteins that are needed for mismatch
repair. However, a MutH homolog has not been identified in
eukaryotes, and the mechanism by which the eukaryotic mismatch
repair system distinguishes between the parental and
daughter strands is not well understood. As with defects in nucleotide
excision repair systems, mutations in the human mismatch
repair system are associated with particular types of cancer. For
example, mutations in two human mismatch repair genes, hMSH2
and hMLH1, play a role in the development of a type of colon
cancer known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.
Double-Strand Breaks Can Be Repaired
by Homologous Recombination Repair
and by Nonhomologous End Joining
Of the many types of DNA damage that can occur within living
cells, the breakage of chromosomes—called a DNA double-strand
break (DSB)—is perhaps the most dangerous. DSBs can be caused
by ionizing radiation (X-rays or gamma rays), chemical mutagens,
and certain drugs used for chemotherapy. In addition, reactive
oxygen species that are the by-products of aerobic metabolism can
cause double-strand breaks. Surprisingly, researchers estimate that
naturally occurring double-strand breaks in a typical human cell
occur at a rate of between 10 and 100 breaks per cell per day! Such
breaks can be harmful in a variety of ways. First, DSBs can result
in chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions and translocations
(see Figure 8.2 ). In addition, DSBs can lead to terminal or
interstitial deficiencies (see Figure 8.3 ). Such genetic changes have
the potential to result in detrimental phenotypic effects.
How are DSBs repaired? The two main mechanisms are
homologous recombination repair (HRR) and nonhomologous
end joining (NHEJ) . Homologous recombination repair,
also called homology-directed repair, occurs when homologous
DNA strands, usually from a sister chromatid, are used to repair
a DSB in the other sister chromatid (Figure 16.24 ). First, the
DSB is processed by the short digestion of DNA strands at the
break site. This processing event is followed by the exchange of
DNA strands between the broken and unbroken sister chromatids.
The unbroken strands are then used as templates to synthesize
DNA in the region where the break occurred. Finally, the
crisscrossed strands are resolved, which means they are broken
and then rejoined in a way that produces separate chromatids.
Because sister chromatids are genetically identical, an advantage is
that homologous recombination repair can be an error-free mechanism
for repairing a DSB. A disadvantage is that sister chromatids
are available only during the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle in
eukaryotes or following DNA replication in bacteria. Although
sister chromatids are strongly preferred, HRR may also occur
between homologous regions that are not identical. Therefore,
HRR may occasionally happen when sister chromatids are unavailable.
The proteins involved in homologous recombination repair
are described in Chapter 17 .
16.3 DNA REPAIR

Because most mutations are deleterious, DNA repair systems
are vital to the survival of all organisms. If DNA repair systems
did not exist, spontaneous and environmentally induced mutations
would be so prevalent that few species, if any, would survive.
The necessity of DNA repair systems becomes evident when
they are missing. Bacteria contain several different DNA repair
systems. Yet, when even a single system is absent, the bacteria
have a much higher rate of mutation. In fact, the rate of mutation
is so high that these bacterial strains are sometimes called mutator
strains. Likewise, in humans, an individual who is defective
in only a single DNA repair system may manifest various disease
symptoms, including a higher risk of skin cancer. This increased
risk is due to the inability to repair UV-induced mutations.
Living cells contain several DNA repair systems that can
fix different types of DNA alterations (Table 16.7 ). Each repair
system is composed of one or more proteins that play specific
roles in the repair mechanism. In most cases, DNA repair is a
multistep process. First, one or more proteins in the DNA repair
system detect an irregularity in DNA structure. Next, the abnormality
is removed by the action of DNA repair enzymes. Finally,
normal DNA is synthesized via DNA replication enzymes. In
this section, we will examine several different repair systems that
have been characterized in bacteria, yeast, mammals, and plants.
Their diverse ways of repairing DNA underscore the extreme
necessity for the structure of DNA to be maintained properly.
Damaged Bases Can Be Directly Repaired
In a few cases, the covalent modification of nucleotides by mutagens
can be reversed by specific cellular enzymes. As discussed
earlier in this chapter, UV light causes the formation of thymine
dimers. Bacteria, fungi, most plants, and some animals produce
an enzyme called photolyase that recognizes thymine dimers
and splits them, which returns the DNA to its original condition
(Figure 16.19a ). Photolyases are flavoproteins that contain two
light-sensitive cofactors. The repair mechanism itself requires
light and is known as photoreactivation. This process directly
restores the structure of DNA. Because plants are exposed to
sunlight throughout the day, photolyase is a critical DNA repair
enzyme for many plant species. A protein known as alkyltransferase can remove methyl
or ethyl groups from guanine bases that have been mutagenized
by alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustard and EMS. This
protein is called alkyltransferase because it transfers the methyl
or ethyl group from the base to a cysteine side chain within the
alkyltransferase protein (Figure 16.19b). Surprisingly, this permanently
inactivates alkyltransferase, which means it can be used
only once!
Base Excision Repair Removes a Damaged Base
A second type of repair system, called base excision repair
(BER), involves the function of a category of enzymes known
as DNA N-glycosylases. This type of enzyme can recognize an
abnormal base and cleave the bond between it and the sugar in
the DNA backbone, creating an apurinic or apyrimidinic site
(Figure 16.20 ). Living organisms produce multiple types of
DNA N-glycosylases, each recognizing particular types of abnormal
base structures. Depending on the DNA N-glycosylase,
this repair system can eliminate abnormal bases such as uracil,
3-methyladenine, 7-methylguanine, and pyrimidine dimers. Base
excision repair is particularly important for the repair of oxidative
DNA damage. Figure 16.20 illustrates the general steps involved in DNA
repair via N-glycosylase. In this example, the DNA contains a
uracil in its sequence. This could have happened spontaneously
or by the action of a chemical mutagen. N-glycosylase recognizes
a uracil within the DNA and cleaves (nicks) the bond between
the sugar and base. This releases the uracil base and leaves
behind an apyrimidinic site. This abnormality is recognized
by a second enzyme, AP endonuclease, which makes a cut on
the 5ʹ side.
Following this cut by AP endonuclease, one of three things
can happen. In some species such as E. coli, DNA polymerase I,
which has a 5ʹ to 3ʹ exonuclease activity, removes a DNA segment
containing the abnormal region and, at the same time, replaces
it with normal nucleotides. This process is called nick translation
(although DNA replication, not mRNA translation, actually
occurs). Alternatively, in eukaryotic species such as humans, the
DNA is repaired in two possible ways. DNA polymerase β has
the enzymatic ability to remove a site, which is missing a base,
and then insert a nucleotide with the correct base in its place.
Another possibility is that DNA polymerase б or ε can synthesize
a short segment of DNA, which generates a flap. The flap is then
removed by flap endonuclease, which is described in Chapter 11 .
In all three cases, the final step is carried out by DNA ligase that
closes a gap in the DNA backbone.
Nucleotide Excision Repair Systems
Remove Segments of Damaged DNA
An important general process for DNA repair is the nucleotide
excision repair (NER) system. This type of system can repair
many different types of DNA damage, including thymine dimers,
chemically modified bases, missing bases, and certain types of
crosslinks. In NER, several nucleotides in the damaged strand
are removed from the DNA, and the intact strand is used as a
template for resynthesis of a normal complementary strand. NER
is found in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes, although its molecular
mechanism is better understood in prokaryotic species.
In E. coli, the NER system requires four key proteins, designated
UvrA, UvrB, UvrC, and UvrD, plus the help of DNA
polymerase and DNA ligase. UvrA, B, C, and D recognize and
remove a short segment of a damaged DNA strand. They are
named Uvr because they are involved in Ultraviolet light repair
of pyrimidine dimers, although the UvrA–D proteins are also
important in repairing chemically damaged DNA.
Figure 16.21 outlines the steps involved in the E. coli NER
system. A protein complex consisting of two UvrA molecules
and one UvrB molecule tracks along the DNA in search of damaged
DNA. Such DNA has a distorted double helix, which is
sensed by the UvrA/UvrB complex. When a damaged segment is
identified, the two UvrA proteins are released, and UvrC binds to
the site. The UvrC protein makes cuts in the damaged strand on
both sides of the damaged site. Typically, the damaged strand is
cut eight nucleotides from the 5ʹ end of the damage and four to
five nucleotides away from the 3ʹ end. After this process, UvrD,
which is a helicase, recognizes the region and separates the two
fills in the gap, using the undamaged strand as a template.
Finally, DNA ligase makes the final covalent connection between
the newly made DNA and the original DNA strand.
In eukaryotes, NER systems are thought to operate similarly
to bacterial systems, though more proteins are involved.
Several human diseases are due to inherited defects in genes
involved in NER. These include xeroderma pigmentosum (XP),
Cockayne syndrome (CS), and PIBIDS. (PIBIDS is an acronym
for a syndrome with symptoms that include photosensitivity;
ichthyosis, a skin abnormality; brittle hair; impaired intelligence;
decreased fertility; and short stature.) A common characteristic
in all three syndromes is an increased sensitivity to sunlight
because of an inability to repair UV-induced lesions. Figure
16.22 shows a photograph of an individual with XP. Such individuals
have pigmentation abnormalities, many premalignant
lesions, and a high predisposition to skin cancer. They may also
develop early degeneration of the nervous system.
Genetic analyses of patients with XP, CS, and PIBIDS have
revealed that these syndromes result from defects in a variety
of different genes that encode NER proteins. For example, XP
can be caused by defects in any of seven different NER genes.
In all cases, individuals have a defective NER pathway. In recent
years, several human NER genes have been successfully cloned
and sequenced. Although more research is needed to completely
understand the mechanisms of DNA repair, the identification of
NER genes has helped unravel the complexities of NER pathways
in human cells.
Mismatch Repair Systems Recognize
and Correct a Base Pair Mismatch
Thus far, we have considered several DNA repair systems that
recognize abnormal nucleotide structures within DNA, including
thymine dimers, alkylated bases, and the presence of uracil in the
DNA. Another type of abnormality that should not occur in DNA
is a base mismatch. The structure of the DNA double helix obeys
the AT/GC rule of base pairing. During the normal course of
DNA replication, however, an incorrect nucleotide may be added
to the growing strand by mistake. This produces a mismatch
between a nucleotide in the parental and the newly made strand.
Various DNA repair mechanisms can recognize and remove this
mismatch. For example, as described in Chapter 11 , DNA polymerase
has a 3ʹ to 5ʹ proofreading ability that can detect mismatches
and remove them. However, if this proofreading ability
fails, cells contain additional DNA repair systems that can detect
base mismatches and fix them. An interesting DNA repair system
that exists in all species is the mismatch repair system.
In the case of a base mismatch, how does a DNA repair
system determine which base to remove? If the mismatch is due
to an error in DNA replication, the newly made daughter strand
contains the incorrect base, whereas the parental strand is normal.
Therefore, an important aspect of mismatch repair is that it
specifically repairs the newly made strand rather than the parental
template strand. Prior to DNA replication, the parental DNA
has already been methylated. Immediately after DNA replication,
some time must pass before a newly made strand is methylated.
Therefore, newly replicated DNA is hemimethylated—only the
parental DNA strand is methylated. Hemimethylation provides a
way for a DNA repair system to distinguish between the parental
DNA strand and the daughter strand.
The molecular mechanism of mismatch repair has been
studied extensively in E. coli. As shown in Figure 16.23 , three
proteins, designated MutS, MutL, and MutH, detect the mismatch
and direct the removal of the mismatched base from the newly
made strand. These proteins are named Mut because their absence
leads to a much higher mutation rate than occurs in normal
strains of E. coli. The role of MutS is to locate mismatches. Once
a mismatch is detected, MutS forms a complex with MutL. MutL
acts as a linker that binds to MutH by a looping mechanism. This
stimulates MutH, which is bound to a hemimethylated site, to
make a cut in the newly made, nonmethylated DNA strand. After
the strand is cut, MutU, which functions as helicase, separates the
strands, and an exonuclease then digests the non methylated DNA
strand in the direction of the mismatch and proceeds beyond the
mismatch site. This leaves a gap in the daughter strand that is
repaired by DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. The net result is
that the mismatch has been corrected by removing the incorrect
region in the daughter strand and then resynthesizing the correct
sequence using the parental DNA as a template.
Eukaryotic species also have homologs to MutS and MutL,
along with many other proteins that are needed for mismatch
repair. However, a MutH homolog has not been identified in
eukaryotes, and the mechanism by which the eukaryotic mismatch
repair system distinguishes between the parental and
daughter strands is not well understood. As with defects in nucleotide
excision repair systems, mutations in the human mismatch
repair system are associated with particular types of cancer. For
example, mutations in two human mismatch repair genes, hMSH2
and hMLH1, play a role in the development of a type of colon
cancer known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.
Double-Strand Breaks Can Be Repaired
by Homologous Recombination Repair
and by Nonhomologous End Joining
Of the many types of DNA damage that can occur within living
cells, the breakage of chromosomes—called a DNA double-strand
break (DSB)—is perhaps the most dangerous. DSBs can be caused
by ionizing radiation (X-rays or gamma rays), chemical mutagens,
and certain drugs used for chemotherapy. In addition, reactive
oxygen species that are the by-products of aerobic metabolism can
cause double-strand breaks. Surprisingly, researchers estimate that
naturally occurring double-strand breaks in a typical human cell
occur at a rate of between 10 and 100 breaks per cell per day! Such
breaks can be harmful in a variety of ways. First, DSBs can result
in chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions and translocations
(see Figure 8.2 ). In addition, DSBs can lead to terminal or
interstitial deficiencies (see Figure 8.3 ). Such genetic changes have
the potential to result in detrimental phenotypic effects.
How are DSBs repaired? The two main mechanisms are
homologous recombination repair (HRR) and nonhomologous
end joining (NHEJ) . Homologous recombination repair,
also called homology-directed repair, occurs when homologous
DNA strands, usually from a sister chromatid, are used to repair
a DSB in the other sister chromatid (Figure 16.24 ). First, the
DSB is processed by the short digestion of DNA strands at the
break site. This processing event is followed by the exchange of
DNA strands between the broken and unbroken sister chromatids.
The unbroken strands are then used as templates to synthesize
DNA in the region where the break occurred. Finally, the
crisscrossed strands are resolved, which means they are broken
and then rejoined in a way that produces separate chromatids.
Because sister chromatids are genetically identical, an advantage is
that homologous recombination repair can be an error-free mechanism
for repairing a DSB. A disadvantage is that sister chromatids
are available only during the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle in
eukaryotes or following DNA replication in bacteria. Although
sister chromatids are strongly preferred, HRR may also occur
between homologous regions that are not identical. Therefore,
HRR may occasionally happen when sister chromatids are unavailable.
The proteins involved in homologous recombination repair
are described in Chapter 17 .

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

19 Re: Perguntas .... on Thu Jul 07, 2016 3:59 pm

Admin


Admin
Magna, 

as it seems, you are not well informed:

Following a list of predictions of intelligent design theory, and its confirmation:

Predictions in  biology: 

- High instructive coded information content will be found throughout the genome, in " junk DNA", and the epigenome– (already proven)
- The non-adequacy of the DNA-centric view to explain biodiversity.  Proven. We know that Membrane targets and patterns,  Cytoskeletal arrays, Centrosomes, Ion channels,  Sugar molecules on the exterior of cells (the sugar code), Gene regulatory networks, the Splicing Code,  the Metabolic Code, the Signal Transduction Codes,  the Signal Integration Codes,  the Histone Code,  the Tubulin Code the Sugar Code  and the Glycomic Code define morphology,  development, cell  and body shape. Basically, macroevolution ( the origin of morphological novelties ) is a falsified prediction, while ID is confirmed. 
- Machine-like irreducibly complex structures will be found – (already proven, and a undeniable fact.   Ken Millers  rebuttal is not a compelling refutation )

- Forms will be found in the fossil record that appear suddenly and without any precursors – ( well known)

- Genes and functional parts will be re-used in different unrelated organisms – ( proven)
- The genetic code will NOT contain much discarded genetic baggage code or functionless “junk DNA” – (being proven over & over today)
- Few or no intermediate forms will found giving a clear and gradual pathway from one family to another.  There are none so far.
Mechanisms for error detection and correction will be abundant within the genome of all organisms – (already proven)
Mechanisms for *non-random* adaptations, coherent with environmental pressures, will be found (already found)
So called vestigial organs will be found to have specific purpose and usefulness – (already proven)
Few mutations will end up being beneficial in the long run – (already proven)
Genetic entropy will be found to cancel our most if any beneficial mutations

In astronomy/astrophysics

- an increase (and not a decrease), as science progresses, in the number of finely-tuned parameters pertinent to the laws and constants of physics

Predictions in Paleontology

- The observed pattern of the fossil record whereby morphological disparity precedes diversity
- Saltational, or abrupt, appearance of new life forms without transitional precursors


ID theory in order to remain in the domain of science does not make any claims about the identity of the designer. That  is in the realm of  philosophy  and theology


The mechanism is , to cite Ann Gauger,  intelligence. Conscious activity. The deliberate choice of a rational agent. Indeed, we have abundant experience in the present of intelligent agents generating specified information. Our experience of the causal powers of intelligent agents -- of "conscious activity" as "a cause now in operation"-- provides a basis for making inferences about the best explanation of the origin of biological information in the past. In other words, our experience of the cause-and-effect structure of the world -- specifically the cause known to produce large amounts of specified information in the present -- provides a basis for understanding what likely caused large increases in specified information in living systems in the past. It is precisely my reliance on such experience that makes possible an understanding of the type of causes at work in the history of life.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

20 Re: Perguntas .... on Mon Nov 28, 2016 5:39 am

Admin


Admin
De novo evolution. In this scenario, randomly occurring sequence combinations WOULD FORM cryptic functional sites (for example, transcription initiation regions, splice sites and polyadenylation sites) and WOULD COME under a regulatory control to produce a distinct processed RNA transcript (FIG. 3). This RNA COULD initially function as an antisense or structural RNA39 and WOULD EVENTUALLY acquire a functional ORF from which a completely new protein COULD EVOLVE. The most stringent criterion for indicating the involvement of this mechanism requires that the corresponding genomic region of the gene is present in outgroup organisms, but as a noncoding stretch that is neither transcribed nor translated. Although this possibility for the emergence of new gene functions initially seemed the least likely2, there are now a number of fully documented cases supporting de novo origination by this mechanism 40–44 (BOX 2). In addition, several surveys identified many more candidates for possible de novo evolved genes in various species45–49.

Observe:

WOULD FORM
WOULD COME
RNA COULD
WOULD EVENTUALLY
COULD EVOLVE

nice quesswork.

40. Cai, J. J., Zhao, R., Jiang, H. & Wang, W. De novo origination of a new proteincoding gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 179, 487–496 (2008).

Claim:

Comparative genomic study supports the notion that novel protein genes derive from preexisting genes or parts of them.

Begging the question. No. It does not support that conclusion. Similar genes just mean they are similar. Nothing else.


For example, exon shuffling, gene duplication, retroposition, and gene fusion and fission all contribute to the origin of new genes (Long et al. 2003).

Agreed. The salient question is however what is the mechanism that conferes the RIGHT NEW SEQUENCE of new functional genomes.

But the de novo gene origination process that a whole protein-coding gene evolves from a fragment of noncoding sequence is considered seldom and receives little attention. A computational analysis of several archeal and proteobacterial species' genomes suggests that at least 240 and 320 genes, respectively, originated de novo along the branches leading to the Archea and Proteobacteria. Furthermore, there are also many de novo origination events among the species within each of the lineages (Snel et al. 2002). On the basis of the analysis, the author ranked the de novo gene origination process quantitatively the second most important process after gene loss among gene loss, de novo origination, gene duplication, gene fusion/fission, and horizontal gene transfer.

This study SUGGESTS that de novo evolution not only plays an important role in generating the initial common ancestral protein repertoire but also contributes to the subsequent evolution of an organism.

So, guesswork, after all.

The second paper

Emergence of a New Gene from an Intergenic Region

states:

every genome harbors also a certain fraction of orphan genes that can not be associated with another known gene. The evolutionary origins of such genes are still rather unclear [2].Also, the taxa analyzed in these studies have comparatively large evolutionary distances, making it difficult to infer the mechanisms of gene emergence.

Begging the question. Nice. The origin of these ophan genes is unclear, but the origin must be evolutionary. Thats typical science paper vocabulary. They assume evolution a priori, since any other possible mechanism is excluded a priori.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

21 Re: Perguntas .... on Wed Feb 08, 2017 4:44 pm

Admin


Admin
Photosynthesis wrote:

"Odds? It's impossible to calculate the odds for abiogenesis Otangelo."

Agreed. We will never have a precise number. But a aproximation is enough. According to Koonin, at his paper "How Many Genes Can Make a Cell: The Minimal-Gene-Set Concept", he gives a figure of a minimal gene set of 250 genes. Another paper, Determination of the Core of a Minimal Bacterial Gene Set, estimates a minimal number of 206 genes. Isn't it remarkable how mainstream science admits irreducible complexity? You can't have a working cell with less than about 200 genes. Whatever cell you point out or imagine of having the minimal number of Genes, is IC.

Chemist Wilhelm Huck, professor at Radboud University Nijmegen
A working cell is more than the sum of its parts. "A functioning cell must be entirely correct at once, in all its complexity,"

Since evolution only begins with self replication, the mechanism to get life to have a first go had to be either luck, or specific constraints of chemical reactions obliguing them to become alive. Since the genetic code is free of constraints and can form any sequence, it wasn't physical/chemical necessity. The only possible alternative mechanism to ID was chance.

If we put a minimal number of 250 different proteins for the most basic cell, then the chance to get this arrangement would be 10 to the 164th power. That equals to impossible by all means.

So you have two irreducible entities: The minimal requirement of genetic information, and a minimal set of proteins and molecules to get a minimal living cell.

The reason that it is impossible is that nobody knows the factors that have to be taken into account. All "odds" calculations that say it's "impossible" come from creationists holding to some weird assumption.

You forget Harold Urey, Richard Dawkins, Paul Davies, Koonin, Mondore, Joseph Mastropaolo, Ph.D, Arthur V. Chadwick, Ph.D.,Michael Denton, Hoyle and Wickramasinghe, Vaneechoutte and many others, which do not buy into that assertion.

"Nobody studying abiogenesis thinks that the first life form had modern proteins that arose by the random assemblage from a soup of amino-acids."

Uhm.... lol.

What about, you ask Larry to introduce you to basic molecular biology ?

http://news.illinois.edu/news/11/1005LUCA_ManfredoSeufferheld_JamesWhitfield_Caetano_Anolles.html
New evidence suggests that LUCA was a sophisticated organism after all, with a complex structure recognizable as a cell, researchers report. Their study appears in the journal Biology Direct. The study lends support to a hypothesis that LUCA may have been more complex even than the simplest organisms alive today, said James Whitfield, a professor of entomology at Illinois and a co-author on the study.

"That research hasn't solve the problem doesn't mean that anything has been "humiliated," it just means that the riddle is still to be solved."

Ah, sure. And when is design as possible cause permitted into the picture, and when given a serious consideration ? At the day of Saint Never ?!


" I'm leaving alone the fantasies that you believe for now, checking if you might try and understand."

Hohoho!! Sounds as if you are the all wise, almost all knowing, almost God-like Super genious which has figured out the truth, and is waiting for me, poor mortal with limited knowledge, to knee down and listen to your words , follow your lips, as if they express the ultimate wisdom and knowledge ???? Me dá licença !!!

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

22 Re: Perguntas .... on Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:35 pm

Admin


Admin
Chris wrote:

You have no evidence IC systems cannot emerge naturally. In the 20+ years since Behe published his IC book, a glorified godofthegaps argument, never once has he conducted a single experiment to demonstrate IC systems cannot evolve. In fact, there is no evidence of this.

You seem to be not well informed :
http://www.evolutionnews.org/2006/10/response_to_barbara_forrests_k_7002560.html
We put, knock out one part, put a good copy of the gene back in, and they can swim. By definition the system is irreducibly complex. We've done that with all 35 components of the flagellum, and we get the same effect.
(Kitzmiller Transcript of Testimony of Scott Minnich pgs. 99-108, Nov. 3, 2005, emphasis added)

"And you have never seen a supernatural being intelligently design anything."

We do not need direct observed empirical evidence to infer design. If investigators know that someone was deliberately killed, is their conclusion invalidated because they don't yet know exactly who did it and how?
When a detective arrives at the crime scence, and sees a bullet in the chest of the victim, and no arm nearby that could be a hint to suicide, the detective can with a degree of certainty conclude the victim was shot in the chest and killed. So its a murder crime scence. Same when we observe the natural world. It gives us hints about how it could have been created. We do not need to present the act of creation to infer creationism / Intelligent design.

"Not at all. As I have already pointed out to you in this thread, I am perfectly willing to consider supernatural explanations. Just provide some empirical evidence."

Haha. Do you have empirical evidence, that natural, aka non intelligent mechanisms can create life ?

"You have no evidence pointing to supernatural intelligent designers."

Check the topic at my library: 125 reasons to believe in God
Pick ANY of them, and privide a better, more compelling explanation based on naturalism, and you have a go. Just one.



View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

23 Re: Perguntas .... on Sun Mar 26, 2017 12:41 pm

Admin


Admin
If you want a serious refutation Otangelo Grasso:

[1] The universe is a set of natural causes of increasing complexity, converging backwards in time towards decreasing complexity. The first cause cannot be of more complexity unless it has a set of preceding levels of decreasing complexity to explain the first cause's (universe) initial complexity. If it is uncaused, it must be sufficiently irreducibly complex. An agent is by definition a reducibly complex thing, not irreducible. Quantum physics is irreducibly complex.

God is not complex
http://reasonandscience.heavenforum.org/t1332-god-is-not-complex
God is a remarkably simple entity. As a non-physical entity, a mind is not composed of parts, and its salient properties, like self-consciousness, rationality, and volition, are essential to it. In contrast to the contingent and variegated universe with all its inexplicable quantities and constants, a divine mind is startlingly simple. Certainly such a mind may have complex ideas—it may be thinking, for example, of the infinitesimal calculus—, but the mind itself is a remarkably simple entity

[2] The first cause of the universe does not have to be an uncaused cause. With each additional overarching temporal cause, there is less need for a designer to be at the helm of the uncaused first cause.

You Will Not Live an Eternity

http://www.str.org/articles/you-will-not-live-an-eternity#.VYTUkflVhBc

We realize that we can never get to an infinite period of time in the future by adding individual events together. But today, this point of time in the present, is a point of time future to all past. Correct? In other words, we are future to yesterday, and the day before that. Now, some have suggested that the universe is eternal. That it has existed forever. But it is not possible that it has existed forever. Here is the application. This point in time is actually future with reference to all of the past. We just agreed that you cannot say that any particular point in the future will accomplish an actual infinite as events are added one to another. Therefore, this present moment in time can't represent an actual infinite number of events added one to another proceeding from the past. Time has proceeded forward from the past as one event is added onto another to get us to today. But we know that whenever you pause in the count as we've done today, that you can't have an infinite number of events. Which means that there is not infinite number of events that goes backward from this point in time. Only a finite number of events. Which means the universe is not eternal. Which means the universe has not existed forever and ever with no beginning, but it in fact had a beginning.

Example: Quantum physics explains why quantum fluctations inevitably result in universes of random 'design'. It is inevitable for this universe to arise.

Why ? There could be no universe. I see no problem. But the probability of getting a life permitting universe by chance is small to the extreme.

The uncaused cause can be used to explain the quantum fluctuations.

Sure. What is your point ?

But there is no intelligence in an inevitable field of fluctuations creating any sort of universe naturally.



[2a] Quantum fluctuations and mechanics sufficiently fit the uncaused cause. Occam's razor prefers this explanation.
[3] God has to be an infinite regress of things. Creating a universe is a temporal action. A temporal action of deliberate intent requires a deliberate thought and calculation that is inevitably temporal as well. Hence, all preceding thoughts are temporal. Hence God either has a beginning or is in infinite regress.

[3a] Quantum mechanics can be reduced to an uncaused cause, even if it's an infinite regress of things, since quantum fluctuations are not calculating deliberately towards something.

[4] A consciousness observed in the universe cannot transcend the physical realm by definition of what we know of consciousness. Any attempt to redefine consciousness is an attempt to use special pleading, and fails.

[5] The universe is a physical manifestation, not of ordered sets of creations/ planned blueprints, but a messy entanglement of natural law acting out in a billion different ways within the context of restricted 'behavior' over billions of years.

There is a spectrum of planets in different states, dependent on the local conditions caused by the imbalance of the initial first cause.

There is a spectrum of stars in different states, dependent on the local conditions caused by the imbalance of the initial first cause.
There is a spectrum of evolving organisms in different states, dependent on the local conditions caused by the imbalance of the initial first cause.

Most of the universe is comprised of dead ends. 99% of the universe is just energy expanding space itself. This is a blind process by a natural algorythm without purpose. It has no goal.
Give a designer gravity, and it is only used efficiently. Give nature gravity, and it results in all logical possibilities.

[6] The universe is destructively ''designed''. A conscious divine intelligent designer has to work non-destructive. Why? Any temporal designer aims to work as non-destructively as possible. Because it is most efficiently.

Either a maximally great designer would want to reflect this in his ability to create the most perfect temporal physical universe possible. Or an intelligent designer of sufficient greatness would aim for the highest possible non-destructiveness. This designer is akin to a baby painting for the first time.

[7] This isn't the work of omnipotence. This isn't the work of omniscience. This isn't the work of benevolence. This isn't the work of any kind of master mind. It is mundane, meaningless at the core, insignificant at the molecular level.

[8] Random mutations, or determined mutations representing a spectrum of effects dependent of local temporal pressures, is evidence of a lack of intended des.ign. There is no need for detrimental mutations to arise

[9] Why the millions of sperm cells and hundreds of egg cells per individual? Evidence of a lack of intended design.

[10] All organisms have their survival dependent on other organisms. Virusses cannot replicate themselves and must invade regular cells and take control of its copying machine. Parasites burrow in the eyes of humans and other animals.

[11] 99% of all species are extinct. Many galaxies suffer from black holes flying rampant through the galaxy's star field. Supernovae destroy potential habitable worlds, while seeding many worlds that could never host life to begin with.

[12] Is it necessary for a God to exist to explain rain? No. Chemistry and physics work fine. Do this for every known natural phenomena. Why would the universe itself then require a God? Sure, you can push God further. But with each overarching caused cause, your need for a God becomes more redundant as all God could've done is create the most basal of systems.

[13] Research shows that we are subject to hyperactive agency detection and pattern seeking, alongside our basal fears, our habit to be superstitious, our appeal to wishful thinking and our innate desire for a narrative where humanity is central.

[14] If God can exist under the condition that none of its actual details are known and that even its consciousness and intentions are debatable, then this God can be reduced to a natural phenomena like quantum mechanics.

[15] if God is perfect or sufficiently knowledgable and powerful, then God would need to create the best possible physical universe. There are many possible configurations that would make this physical universe superior, without the paradox in which God creates a creation of equal greatness (to itself).

Conclusion: A god cannot exist by any definition provided so far. Naturalism must result in a universe at some point, and will provide a universe, albeit in an entangled mess of natural laws, destructively leading to dead ends.

Every God is a logical contradiction with reality, and every attempt to redefine God back into existence leads to appeals of emotion and many other fallacies.

View user profile http://elshamah.heavenforum.com

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum